How to Write Dissertation Chapters

April 29, 2021
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Ordering a great dissertation from an amazing team

If you’re hard at work doing your dissertation, it’s good you learn that the best way to do it is dividing it into many different sections. A regular thesis contains the introduction, the literary review, the methodology section and the conclusions. Writing great chapters is a challenge, and one of the most common mistakes is failing to properly arrange them in the paper. So if you find it difficult, the best way to proceed is to leave it in the hands of professionals. Our team will gladly provide an amazing outline for your dissertation and give excellent writing services.

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If what you’re looking for is a place to find advice on dissertation chapters, you are more than welcome to use this structure.

A double underlined item needs to be a heading or a title of your dissertation. Unless your dissertation chair instructs you to do so, you shouldn’t divert from the headings order. Your work shouldn’t be limited by these headings, though. The last page of this document lists the resources for the dissertation.

First chapter: Intro

The introduction should specify the central problem or question leading to your research, as well as properly explain the reasons for it. This reasoning process is often called a theoretical argument. It gives the study justification, regarding how much the information you’re about to provide is needed, with the purpose of developing or testing a theory that further justify, describe or explain a certain phenomenon in education. More information on a good introduction can be found in the APA manual.

  1. Overall layout of points of interest – preparing the stage (3-4 paragraphs)
  2. Meaning of the issue
    1. Provide specific reasoning correlated to the topic in question.
    2. Why is this study meaningful?
    3. It shouldn’t be a long chapter, but it should have a big impact!
    4. What are your reasons, in theory and practice, for seeking answers to your proposed research questions?
  3. Going through the theoretical basis of the study
    1. You will most likely need a theoretical basis for organizing the variables taken into consideration when you answer the research questions. You will have to justify your hypothesis will help the reader properly understand the study. The Chapter 2 Literature Review should analyze all theoretical views.
    2. Important terms and constructs should be properly defined, while defining operational definitions should be done in the methods section.
  4. Literature crucial to your work should be critically analyzed and criticized
    1. You should use all studies found in existing literary works that have all the constructs and variables that can be found in the proposed study.
    2. This may be done by taking only some variables and examining them, and then repeating the whole process with a different set of variables, as current literary research does not contain all of them.
  5. Stating the problem
    1. Be short and to the point when stating the research purpose.
    2. The problem statement should be preceded and supported by the introduction.
  6. Hypotheses and questions for the research
    1. Usually, the person doing the research will have some questions, each with a number of hypotheses.
    2. Variables here shouldn’t be operationalized. The language of constructs should be used when writing questions and hypotheses.
    3. A question used in the research needs to be formed as a question, suggesting a relation between constructs; note that it should be testable (with empirical methods, if possible).
    4. Writing declarative statements in the predicted or expected direction is called making hypotheses. They’re usually written in the past tense and can be called research, theoretical or scientific hypotheses.
    5. An example of a hypothesis:
      • Question: How does dyslexia affect the learning abilities of teenagers suffering from it?
      • First hypothesis: Teenagers who accept their dyslexia diagnosis are far more likely to use coping strategies to help them focus on one particular problem than those who will not accept their learning disability.
      • Second hypothesis: Teenagers who accept their dyslexia diagnosis will be more reliant on support from the community than those who will not accept their disability.
      • Third hypothesis: Teenagers who do not accept their learning disability will have coping strategies that are more avoidant than teenagers who accept their dyslexia diagnosis
      • The second and third hypotheses are crafted in such a way that each group’s coping strategy is presented. Also, the terms aren’t operationalized.

Second chapter: reviewing literature

This is the chapter where things already written in that specific area of interest are reviewed. Added literature should support the theoretical starting point of the paper and should show that the author has a good understanding of the findings and ideas relevant to the topic. The APA manual contains more information regarding literature reviews.

  1. Historical context
    1. Every analyzed aspect needs to be put into perspective; however, remember that a dissertation is not a full chronology so cannot focus on every single detail of the process/event in question
    2. Show context for all the relevant variables and analyze all the issues that affect your study.
  2. Theory should be linked to the questions and hypotheses in the research
    1. What are the theoretical models and perspectives of your research?
    2. Different theories should be compared so your dissertation has a solid theoretical foundation
    3. Bind that theoretical foundation to the problem highlighted in the paper.
  3. Questions and hypotheses from existing empirical literature connected to the research
    1. This part should include:
      • Literature linked to each variable
      • Literature linked to specific combinations of variables that are relevant to the theme
    2. Do more than simply list the studies, and try to find similarities and common points that bring them together. Transitions should be used to link one section to another
    3. Show the pluses and minuses of previously conducted studies and discuss how you plan on to improve upon the pluses and avoid the minuses in your own one.
    4. This part should be organized with headings and subheadings. A concept map showing all relevant literature should be considered, as this section should fully show your methods of deduction and reasoning, starting out with a broad picture and narrowing it as you go along.

Third chapter – method

This chapter should offer enough information regarding used methodology to allow the entire study to be replicated. Some parts of this chapter should be analysis, participants, procedure or instruments. The APA manual provides further information regarding the methods section.

  1. Participants
    1. The IRB clearance for human subjects should be fully documented in the paper and submitted after the proposal.
    2. The reader should have enough detail on the subjects to be able to visualize them. Their characteristics should be presented here instead of the results section.
    3. The methods used for selecting the sample should be described in detail. This is not the section in which to fully disclose criteria for inclusion and exclusion, though.
    4. The sample size should be determined by conducting and reporting a power analysis. The final document should include these findings, along with an explanation if the final analyses have significantly more or less subjects.
    5. If an attrition occurred, information about the ones who dropped out, along with their reasons, should be fully disclosed.
    6. Missing information should be handled and discussed.
    7. This is a section where a survey’s rate of return should be mentioned
  2. Measures
    1. If you use a new measuring technique or an undocumented instrument, make sure you give a detailed description. The appendices should also contain copies of instruments that were not published. If you use unpublished instruments, you’ll probably need to use analyses for validity and reliability.
    2. Necessary citations should be used when working with instruments or techniques that are already published and have been used before.
    3. Evidence of the validity and reliability of used measures should be explicitly stated. If previous studies do not provide that information, the procedure and instruments need to be piloted. All instruments should come with information proving their validity to the present study.
    4. This section should be formatted according to the measured constructs. When measures contain more constructs, the measure assessing them needs to be clearly described, and its reliability and validity properly explained.
  3. Design research
    1. A general description written in accepted terms should be provided when it comes to the research design. Possible internal and external validity threads to the design should also be highlighted.
    2. Both dependent and independent variables should be listed, along with their operational definitions.
    3. A diagram or figure of the design often proves useful.
  4. Procedures
    1. The procedures’ description should be detailed enough so that anyone wanting to replicate the study would be able to do so.
    2. Any used survey should come with the data collecting method, return rate, along with a description of general procedures and reasoning for non-responders.
    3. Any copies of used materials should be added to the appendix.
  5. Analyzing data
    1. All questions and hypotheses in the research should be restated.
    2. A statistical analysis should follow each hypothesis
    3. A short description should be included, along with the assumptions leading to the statistical analysis and reasoning for each statistical technique.
    4. Specify what alpha levels are used to pinpoint statistical significance.

Fourth Chapter: Results

Results of all analyses are presented in this chapter, most commonly in order of research questions, and any results of supplementary analyses (that were not initially planned, but needed along the way) are listed as well. No interpretation should come with the results, as they should be included in chapter 5.

  1. Nomothetic Studies’ presentation order
    1. Descriptive statistics such as frequencies or standard deviations, for each variable present in the study.
    2. Initial statistical analyses
    3. Each question or hypothesis answered by a statistical analysis
    4. The dissertation chair should be consulted when deciding the order for single-study, small or qualitative studies.
  2. Research questions and hypothesis answered by statistical analyses
    1. Questions and hypotheses should be used as an outline for organizing results
    2. Every hypothesis and question needs to be restated along with all the assumption test results and the analyzing of data that provides answers to those hypotheses and questions.
    3. The test statistical power and size of its effect should be reported
  3. Structuring information into tables and figures
    1. All tables or figures used need to correspond with references in the actual text
    2. Figures and tables shouldn’t need reference to the text; in order to be properly understood, their description should contain full information about them
    3. The tables and figures need to be placed immediately after they are mentioned in a text, whenever it’s possible.

Fifth Chapter: Discussion

The results need to be interpreted and correlated with the questions within the research, and other literature should be taken into consideration when discussing them. You also need to present the limitations and implications regarding further research. The APA manual contains further information on methods sections.

  1. Summary
    1. The summary of results should be brief
    2. Non-statistical terms should be used when discussing results, and the research question and hypothesis have to be answered.
  2. Conclusions
    1. Headings should be used when organizing this section
    2. The results implications need to be explicitly discussed. Theoretical background and literature findings that are relevant to the subject will also be integrated.
    3. Cite the studies in the literature review when pointing out both consistencies and inconsistencies in their results.
    4. Specify if your findings confirm or contradict existent knowledge on the subject matter
    5. If you clearly specify your intentions, it is perfectly fine to speculate regarding the meaning of the results.
  3. Limitations
    1. An impairment or weakness that threatens the results’ internal or external validity is called a limitation. An example of this would be a limited study sample, like a sample where all participants are male. A thorough analysis prior to the study conception should pinpoint most limitations, so the ones that remain are those who are beyond the researcher’s control.
    2. Limitations often occur in situations such as the results being too generalized, or controls that are impossible to meet. An example would be using intact groups instead of random assignments, and how that would affect the overall result interpretation.
  4. Future research recommendations
    1. Specific guidance should be provided regarding the dissertation findings and their correlation with existing empirical and theoretical base.
    2. Explain the need for the proposed research and the shape in which it should be presented.

References appendices

All sources used during your research for the dissertation should be included in this section. The sources are listed alphabetically, with each new source starting with a new line. The actual formatting will depend on the academic format you are structuring the paper in. Since APA is one of the most common dissertation formatting styles, you should once again visit their website for the latest updates on referencing guidelines.

Finalising your work

A dissertation is a very complex and lengthy assignment, which is why it will, most likely, require a lot of editing. Of course, you cannot start proofreading your work as soon as you finish it – this will not make any sense at all. However, you can safely get back to it later – this way, you’ll catch not only minor typos but also logical flaws (if any).

If you do not have the time to edit a dissertation on your own, there is no shame in contacting a professional editor. In fact, it would be wise to do so in any case – given the complexity of the assignment. Apart from writing dissertation chapters, our team will gladly lend you a hand with the proofreading. This way, you can stay absolutely certain that every aspect of your academic work is truly polished to perfection.

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How to Write an ACT Essay

April 29, 2021
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Writing can sometimes be viewed in a black and white light. You either know it or you don’t know it. This makes it quite difficult for one to explain or teach it. It even gets worse when one is given the task to teach and there is a time limit. And this is just basic writing. Writing for standardized tests get even harder and one may despair. ACT tests are just most of the common standardized test that students take. At just the mention of it, virtually every one of them gets chills. However, when approached in the right way, and with a positive mindset, you can write the essay almost flawlessly.

This article will highlight some of the best approaches you can use to write an ACT essay. We’ve broken them down into easily digestible tips which we know you’ll understand easily. The key to perfecting it, just like any other skill, is through practice and learning. You just need to get a good model and study it extensively. We are going to cover one of the best models you can use.

Tackling ACT Writing, Step by Step Guide

We are going to demonstrate ACT writing through a viable essay plan that has been modified to fit into most ACT writing tests. The plan includes a template that consists of three sections, namely, planning, writing, and revising. We believe that if you use this template, you will get to learn much faster and with more precision. Your ACT essays will greatly improve in quality and form.

Below is a sample prompt that we will respond to:

Intelligent Machines

A significant amount of products that we rely on daily are heavily automated and intelligent. They have replaced the human effort that was previously applied. A practical case could be of assembly lines. Robots are being used to build cars and other products on assembly lines. Conversations are also largely conducted by sophisticated machines as opposed to people. Retail stores are also getting automated. Nowadays, shopping can be done easily without much help from human cashiers.

The worldwide shift to automation can be regarded as an indicator of progress. It makes work easier and complements human efforts in undertaking tasks. Even so, there is an implication. When machines are used, human effort is considered obsolete. The effort that humans were used to applying in various tasks has no bearing at all. This raises fundamental questions such as, what is lost when human effort is not used; what does this loss mean? Let’s consider some perspectives.

  • First Perspective: When a machine or some other form of technology is used in place of a human, there is one thing that is fundamentally lost; humanity. Some part of our own humanity is lost and replaced. This even makes our daily social interactions suffer as our humanity goes down the drain. Values such as courtesy, tolerance, and respect, no longer have a place in daily encounters.
  • Second Perspective: Machines work better than humans. They have ultimate precision when working at high speeds and are also good at repetitive low skill jobs. Thus, machines are efficient in a sense; by virtue of using low resources while achieving maximum output. They hence lead to better outcomes and more prosperity in the contemporary world.
  • Third Perspective: Humans have always sought things that they can perceive with their senses. Thus, they can be said to have a limited perception that revolves around any aspect that they can hear, see, touch, taste or feel. However, with the advent of machines, these perceptions are changing. The ideas, thoughts, and positions that were previously held are being challenged. New ideas are forthcoming and even the nature of humanity is being put into question. Questions revolving around what humanity entails or it can be are surfacing. This has stimulated humans to accept new ideas and seek new possibilities. Humans have even motivated to push machines to reach new unimagined heights.

With the above perspectives, write an essay about the ever increasing use of intelligent machines.

Stage 1: Planning

Approximate time: 10 to 12 minutes

Planning is an essential tool that is often overlooked when writing ACT essays. From our experience, it is something that should be done at the onset of writing. It becomes cumbersome to plan as you write; making you take even longer to write your work. It may seem unnecessary at the mention of it, however, the impact it has is immense. Planning helps you to organize thoughts, ideas, and opinions before putting them to paper. It gives you the rationale and outline to be used when writing.

Step 1: Read the Question and the Perspectives Provided, Then Choose (Tentatively) a Position

A vital part of writing your essay will involve forming relationships between your perspective and another one out of the provided. This requires you to have an in-depth understanding of each prompt. Most prompts come in a general format, where an assertion is made followed by an opinion that broadens the subject. In our example about intelligent machines, each of the prompts has a general assertion that is quickly followed by a statement that gives a wider perspective on the prompt. This makes it even easier for you to come up with your own opinion and perspective.

Many students would want to add another perspective. Even as it is not wrong to do so, we wouldn’t recommend it. Coming with a fourth perspective would take much of your time which would have been dedicated to other activities. You are better off using that time coming up with a good comparison of your perspective and the other three perspectives.

There’s a scenario where your perspective is a blend of other perspectives. In this case, it is good to present it. However, as you present it, ensure that the comparison with the each of the three perspectives mentioned is made. Emphasis is placed on these comparisons since they help you meet the requirements of the essay. The essay requires you to write an analysis of your perspective and at least one other. Thus, the bottom line is to always choose the perspective that you know you can support well.

For this sample, we are going to choose the third perspective since we are confident that we’ll come up with sufficient support for it.

Step 2: Brainstorm Evidence and Support for Each Perspective

As part of writing your ACT essay involves highlighting the relationships between your perspective and one of the other perspectives given, solid evidence is needed. You ought to research extensively to determine which perspective allows you to table as much evidence as possible. This ought to be done while still planning so as to enable you to switch comfortably to the perspective that has more material.

While tabling your evidence, be flexible. It is not imperative for you to write whole sentences and phrases. This is one of the perks of writing an Act essay. Save the long sentences for other types of writing.

Sources of Evidence

Opening Paragraph of the prompt:

To enable you to embark on serious fact-finding, read the opening paragraph of the essay prompt. It will help you come up with sufficient examples that could be of vital use in your essay. It will stimulate and direct your thoughts on specific ideas that can form the substance of your essay.

Personal Experience

To support your points, you can narrate a personalized story. It could be real or fictitious. Ensure that it is highly personal. It could either be a narration of your own ordeals or that of another person.

Statistics

Numbers are of the essence when trying to prove an important point. You could invent your own research study that has all the relevant statistics of your subject. Again, they could be real or fictitious. Just ensure that they are consistent and believable. For example, you can write about a study that involves automated call menus. You could then present some statistics such as; about 80 % of people who use automated call menus end up dissatisfied. This can be a great support for the first perspective.

On the second perspective, you could present statistics that show that automated cashiers are more efficient than human cashiers. For example, automated cashiers are 5 times better at performing check-outs as compared to human cashiers. You could also claim that their volumes of sales that are processed by automated cashiers are 3 times more than those processed by human cashiers.

You can play around with figures as much as you want for as much you are supporting one of the three perspectives.

Specifics from Sources

When seeking support for your perspectives, utilize various sources. They could be historical sources or facts obtained from current events. Get the correct details so as to present a valid and sound argument. But don’t overwork yourself while trying to get sources. Your grade won’t be affected if you present information that is not factual.

Let’s consider the evidence we gathered for our essay:

First Perspective:

When a machine or some other form of technology is used in place of a human, there is one thing that is fundamentally lost; humanity. Some part of our own humanity is lost and replaced. This even makes our daily social interactions suffer as our humanity goes down the drain. Values such as courtesy, tolerance, and respect, no longer have a place in daily encounters.

Evidence: A significant number of phone conversations are conducted with top-notch technology. Human interactions over the phone have greatly diminished. However, as much as there is this shift, it is not a guarantee that technology works 100%.

Explanation: People tend to get frustrated with technology at times. In most instances, people hit the ‘0’ dial to speak with an actual person due to this frustration. And since the frustration is still present, the conversation is always heated and characterized by sharp outbursts of anger.

Second Perspective:

Machines work better than humans. They have ultimate precision when working at high speeds and are also good at repetitive low skill jobs. Thus, machines are efficient in a sense; by virtue of using low resources while achieving maximum output. They hence lead to better outcomes and more prosperity in the contemporary world.

Evidence: There are robots that actually build cars on modern-day assembly lines.

Explanation: It is much efficient, has lower costs and eliminates and greatly decreases the risk of injury to human workers.

Third Perspective:

Humans have always sought things that they can perceive with their senses. Thus, they can be said to have a limited perception that revolves around any aspect that they can hear, see, touch, taste or feel. However, with the advent of machines, these perceptions are changing. The ideas, thoughts, and positions that were previously held are being challenged. New ideas are forthcoming and even the nature of humanity is being put into question. Questions revolving around what humanity entails or it can be are surfacing. This has stimulated humans to accept new ideas and seek new possibilities. Humans have even motivated to push machines to reach new unimagined heights.

Evidence: There are strides in technology that have been made with regard to brain-computer interfaces. People are able to control the functions and capabilities of computers with their brains.

Explanation: The motivation of this cutting-edge technology is to stimulate people to overcome their human inclinations and limitations. It also offers inspiration to people to undertake research to expand their knowledge on matters on a continuous basis.

Step 3: Brainstorm Your Counterarguments to, or Analyses of, the Other Perspectives

ACT responses are universal. There are neither rules nor standard procedures as to how you should answer the perspectives.

To illustrate: Let’s say we agreed with the first perspective, which has a negative connotation of the effects that intelligent machines have on humans. For a start, we may describe in detail the perspectives that hold positive views, in just one paragraph.

After presenting the two positive perspectives, we then can provide an antithesis in the second paragraph. This will pave way for a nice support of the first perspective. If we are rooting for the third perspective (machines stimulating humans to reach new heights), we will present arguments against the first and second perspectives. We have strong evidence to enable us to provide a thorough analysis of both.

First Perspective:

When a machine or some other form of technology is used in place of a human, there is one thing that is fundamentally lost; humanity. Some part of our own humanity is lost and replaced. This even makes our daily social interactions suffer as our humanity goes down the drain. Values such as courtesy, tolerance, and respect, no longer have a place in daily encounters.

Evidence: A significant number of phone conversations are conducted with top-notch technology. Human interactions over the phone have greatly diminished. However, as much as there is this shift, it is not a guarantee that technology works 100%.

Explanation: People tend to get frustrated with technology at times. In most instances, people hit the ‘0’ dial to speak with an actual person due to this frustration. And since the frustration is still present, the conversation is always heated and characterized by sharp outbursts of anger.

Counterargument: The benefits that accrue are much than the costs incurred. When people are provided with the option of submitting their prescriptions or ask about basic stuff through an automated system, there are great savings in time for the customer care officials. These officials will have more time to focus on crucial matters. Recorded calls can also be used to improve service delivery based on the different reactions of customers at the time of calling.

Second Perspective:

Machines work better than humans. They have ultimate precision when working at high speeds and are also good at repetitive low skill jobs. Thus, machines are efficient in a sense; by virtue of using low resources while achieving maximum output. They hence lead to better outcomes and more prosperity in the contemporary world.

Evidence: There are robots that actually build cars on modern-day assembly lines.

Explanation: It is much efficient, has lower costs and eliminates and greatly decreases the risk of injury to human workers

Counterargument: This perspective presents the true scenario of machines. However, it is limited in the sense that it does not consider the implications in an objective way. As much as robots can perform some actions in place of humans, they can also work alongside humans. Take an example of medical surgeries. Robots can complement the work of surgeons thereby increasing the precision of surgeries. When robots work with humans, the result is a better outcome in the specific undertaking.

Step 4: Organize Your Essay

At this point, you have the central points of your essay. The only remaining part is organizing them in a coherent way. As for the introduction, ensure that it has a thesis statement. This statement should be your individual view on the subject, of which you are trying to prove in your essay.

A succinct conclusion should also be included as part your organization. Transitions are also important your essay. They should be added to aid the flow of your work. However, these can be added as you are writing, no need for you to plan them in advance.

Introduction

The advent of machines was thought to be a great breakthrough for the world. However, the increasing use and complexity of these machines have presented a challenge for humans to get better or get shaped out, etc.

The above is a great introduction to the essay.

Body Paragraph 1

  • The first perspective argues that when a machine or some other form of technology is used in place of a human, there is one thing that is fundamentally lost; humanity. Some part of our own humanity is lost and replaced. This even makes our daily social interactions suffer as our humanity goes down the drain. Values such as courtesy, tolerance, and respect, no longer have a place in daily encounters.
  • We can authoritatively say that this assertion is true. We have all witnessed this phenomenon in our daily lives. We all that one friend who acts up when having a phone conversation using automated machines. This is mostly caused by the frustration that comes when a machine refuses to do as they please. By the time this friend gets to speak with a human, they are already livid with rage. Their sense of courtesy and decorum had already left and the human just has to contend with their discourtesy.
  • In as much as frustration tags along, the benefits are much weightier than the costs. When people are able to submit their prescription or possibly ask about basic stuff, the customer care representatives can have more time to focus on pressing matters. The recordings of calls can also be used for quality purposes.

Body Paragraph 2

  • The second perspective can be contrasted to the first one. The premise of the second perspective revolves around the ability of machines to perform repetitive tasks much more efficiently and precisely than humans.
  • Various auto plants the world over are filled with robots. They are used in assembly lines to build cars. They do work with utmost precision. The overall costs are also less than having employees around. In fact, it makes more economic sense to have machines work than humans. For these machines, there is a one-off cost whereas maintaining a workforce means recurrent expenditures on salaries all year round. Also, there are more risks associated with having a workforce working on assembly plants. They are susceptible to injury and health hazards which raises liability issues for the employer.
  • Although the argument presented in this perspective is sound, it doesn’t give an objective and wholesome view of the implications. As much as a robot can do things that humans can do, they can be used to work alongside humans. They could be used to better the outcome of human work, such as surgery.

Body Paragraph 3

  • The advent of intelligent machines in human life has stimulated the re-thinking of our pre-conceived perceptions of human ability in the present and in the future.
  • Of recent origin is the brain-computer interfaces. Technology has advanced such that people are able to control computers with their brains.
  • The brain interface technology has enabled people to overcome some of their physical limitations. It has also promoted diversity as it captures the interests of people from various backgrounds. These interests are applied in non-scientific fields to create new inventions that were previously unthought-of. The world is now being viewed in a whole new light and interactions are being made on whole new level.

Conclusion Sentence

In conclusion, it is much better for humans to embrace machines in a collaborative way. They should not be viewed as a threat to humanity, but rather as a means through which humanity can transform to greatness.

At this juncture, you are set for your writing. It should take you about 25 minutes.

Stage 2: Writing

Approximate Time: 20 to 23 minutes

After structuring your arguments, all that is left is to write them down.

Step 5: Introduction Paragraph & Thesis

Begin by writing your introduction. Make it as interesting as possible. Ensure that your thesis is brought to a broad light. If you have any difficulty in coming up with an effective introduction, then leave some space and attend to it later.

From the horse-pulled cart of ancient royalties to the electric train of the modern age, machines have had a tremendous influence on human development…

Your thesis should be adequately presented. Half of your essay should have your say on the subject and the correlation to at least one perspective that is in the prompt.

While some people hold the position that the coming of machines was a spell of doom for humanity, the increasing use of intelligent machines has challenged the same people to question their perceptions and beliefs. Human limitations are being countered and advanced possibilities are in the offing.

Step 6: Body Paragraphs

While writing your body paragraphs, ensure that your sentences draw parallels to your first paragraph. The first paragraph should always refer to your thesis statement to present a conclusive argument.

The linguistics surrounding the advent of machines and their presence in daily life (as shown in the first perspective) revolves around machines removing basic humanity.

After presenting this sentence, follow up with an antithesis to your own argument (from the first perspective). Go further and support this perspective with valid arguments and sound evidence in the subsequent three to six sentences.

We can authoritatively say that this assertion is true. We have all witnessed this phenomenon in our daily lives. A friend acting up when having a phone conversation using automated machines is a perfect example. This is mostly caused by the frustration that comes when a machine refuses to do as they please. By the time our friend gets to speak with a human, they are already livid with rage. This outburst of anger continues such that when the automated system routes to the human customer care representative, our friend can no longer hold their anger. The sense of courtesy and decorum had already left and the human just has to contend with our friend’s discourtesy.

Follow with your counterargument and try to relate it to your thesis.

Despite the frustration experiences at the hands of the automated system, the benefits are much weightier than the costs. When people are able to submit their prescription or possibly ask about basic stuff, the customer care representatives can have more time to focus on pressing matters. Also, the recordings of such outbursts in calls can also be used for quality purposes. It can lead to the improvement of the whole automated service to make them more responsive to the needs of the people who call. It can avail options of recourse whenever a customer’s problem is complex. Thus, we can deduce that the frustration that is caused by these machines are only short term as the benefits that accrue after are much better and weightier.

Body Paragraph 2

The second paragraph should divulge more information of your analysis of the relationship between the two perspectives. You can as well introduce your opinion on the second perspective if you are comparing your perspective to one of the perspectives in the prompt.

In another light, as elaborated in the second perspective, machines can be used to undertake tasks more precisely and efficiently.

Elaborate the argument presented in the second perspective in about three to six sentences.

They are used in assembly lines to build cars. They do work with utmost precision. The overall costs are also less than having employees around. In fact, it makes more economic sense to have machines work than humans. For these machines, there is a one-off cost whereas maintaining a workforce means recurrent expenditures on salaries all year round. The risks and negative implications of having a workforce working on assembly plants are minimized or eliminated. Thus, the employer can be free of any liability issues. Manufacturers and production plants are now able to realize the benefits of having an efficient and effective system. The overhead costs will be greatly reduced. The returns will be much higher and the quality of products will also improve.

Ensure that you make draw a parallel to your perspective while explaining the above perspective.

Although the argument presented in this perspective is sound, it doesn’t give an objective and wholesome view of the implications. As much as a robot can do things that humans can do, they can be used to work alongside humans. They can complement the work of humans to achieve an almost perfect outcome; which could never be realized when humans are working alone. They could be used to control delicate procedures, such as surgical operations. This would never have been imagined decades ago but is now a reality.

Body Paragraph 3

Present your central perspective and link it back to the counterarguments that you have already presented on either of the perspectives given.

The advent of intelligent machines in human life has stimulated the re-thinking of our pre-conceived perceptions of human ability in the present and in the future.

Present a final elaboration that supports your perspective.

Of recent origin is the brain-computer interfaces. Technology has advanced such that people are able to control computers with their brains. By simply attaching electrodes to their heads, humans can manipulate these computers. The brain interface technology has enabled people to overcome some of their physical limitations. Take an example of people suffering from paralysis. They have overcome their paralysis which previously rendered them unable to communicate. They can communicate by forming words on computer screens. Also, brain-computer interfaces have promoted diversity as they capture the interests of people from various backgrounds. These interests are applied in non-scientific fields to create new inventions that were previously unthought-of. The world is now being viewed in a whole new light and interactions are being made on whole new level. A case of music, brain-computer interfaces have integrated people’s thoughts and preferences to create music that relates to them.

For sure, apart from the utility that they bring in efficiency, intelligent machines have paved the way for humans to achieve great heights in their development.

Step 7: Conclusion

Stay abreast of time. At this point, you should strive to have about 3-5 minutes.

Develop a sentence that restates your thesis statement. This should summarize your essay.

In conclusion, it is much better for humans to embrace machines in a collaborative way as a means through which humanity can transform to greatness.

Stage 3: Revising

Time: 1 to 3 minutes

Step 8: Reread and Revise

Let’s examine our complete ACT essay example.

From the horse-pulled cart of ancient royalties to the electric train of the modern age, machines have had a tremendous influence on human development. While some people hold the position that the coming of machines was a spell of doom for humanity, the increasing use of intelligent machines has challenged the same people to question their perceptions and beliefs. Human limitations are being countered and advanced possibilities are in the offing.

The linguistics surrounding the advent of machines and their presence in daily life (as shown in the first perspective) revolves around machines removing basic humanity. We can authoritatively say that this assertion is true. We have all witnessed this phenomenon in our daily lives. A friend acting up when having a phone conversation using automated machines is a perfect example. This is mostly caused by the frustration that comes when a machine refuses to do as they please. By the time our friend gets to speak with a human, they are already livid with rage. This outburst of anger continues such that when the automated system routes to the human customer care representative, our friend can no longer hold their anger. The sense of courtesy and decorum had already left and the customer care representative just has to contend with our friend’s discourtesy.

Despite the frustration experiences at the hands of the automated system, the benefits are much weightier than the costs. When people are able to submit their prescription or possibly ask about basic stuff, the customer care representatives can have more time to focus on pressing matters. Also, the recordings of such outbursts in calls can also be used for quality purposes. It can lead to the improvement of the whole automated service to make them more responsive to the needs of the people who call. It can avail options of recourse whenever a customer’s problem is complex. Thus, we can deduce that the frustration that is caused by these machines are only short term as the benefits that accrue after are much better and weightier.

In another light, as elaborated in the second perspective, machines can be used to undertake tasks more precisely and efficiently. They are used in assembly lines to build cars. They do work with utmost precision. The overall costs are also less than having employees around. In fact, it makes more economic sense to have machines work than humans. For these machines, there is a one-off cost whereas maintaining a workforce means recurrent expenditures on salaries all year round. The risks and negative implications of having a workforce working on assembly plants are minimized or eliminated. Thus, the employer can be free of any liability issues. Manufacturers and production plants are now able to realize the benefits of having an efficient and effective system. The overhead costs will be greatly reduced. The returns will be much higher and the quality of products will also improve.

Although the argument presented in this perspective is sound, it doesn’t give an objective and wholesome view of the implications. As much as a robot can do things that humans can do, they can be used to work alongside humans. They can complement the work of humans to achieve an almost perfect outcome; which could never be realized when humans are working alone. They could be used to control delicate procedures, such as surgical operations. This would never have been imagined decades ago but is now a reality.

The advent of intelligent machines in human life has stimulated the re-thinking of our pre-conceived perceptions of human ability in the present and in the future. Of recent origin is the brain-computer interfaces. Technology has advanced such that people are able to control computers with their brains. By simply attaching electrodes to their heads, humans can manipulate these computers. The brain interface technology has enabled people to overcome some of their physical limitations. Take an example of people suffering from paralysis. They have overcome their paralysis which previously rendered them unable to communicate. They can communicate by forming words on computer screens. Also, brain-computer interfaces have promoted diversity as they capture the interests of people from various backgrounds. These interests are applied in non-scientific fields to create new inventions that were previously unthought-of. The world is now being viewed in a whole new light and interactions are being made on whole new level. A case of music, brain-computer interfaces have integrated people’s thoughts and preferences to create music that relates to them. For sure, apart from the utility that they bring in efficiency, intelligent machines have paved the way for humans to achieve great heights in their development.

In conclusion, it is much better for humans to embrace machines in a collaborative way as a means through which humanity can transform to greatness.

Use the remaining one to three minutes to go through your essay to revise any point that needs revision. While at it also correct any mistakes. Replace un-matching words and problematic phrases.

At long last, you now know how to write an impressive ACT essay. If any of these explanations were not clear, re-read it for more clarity. Thereafter, you can go ahead and try to write an ACT essay by yourself given a sample prompt.

How Can You Hack It by Yourself?

Have a habit of planning your essays before you start writing. This should take about 10 minutes. Have a goal of observing the time limits; but before you can get used to it, slot yourself more time. As you get better, reduce the time limits.

Conclusion

For sample essay prompts, you can use our sample ACT essay prompts or questions. You can also view our enhanced writing tips if you are seeking to polish up your ACT essay writing skills.

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How To Write a College Application Essay

April 29, 2021
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Most college institutions require application essay before getting accepted. This should be seen as a chance to prove your greatest skills! Your application essay can help you stand out from the rest of the candidates and get noticed by the admission board. Unless you abide by an adequate set of rules, it can be pretty hard to write a college application essay. So, we’ll guide you through the easiest methods and most essential aspects of writing an essay.

College Application Essay: How to Begin Writing It

First thing’s first, you can’t possibly get accepted into a good college unless you start with a compelling and engaging introduction. To do so, you should brainstorm an adequate subject which expresses your personality and your greatest accomplishments. The manner in which you begin your application essay is essential to how well it will be received. So, you’d better take your time and focus during this phase. As you start the writing process, the two most useful pieces of advice from admission committee members are to show who you are and to make your point clear.

The Brainstorming Process

Brainstorming is of great importance. This goes for any type of essay. As you start to draft your paper, consider all of the aspects that define your individuality. Think about your passions, pastimes or concerns. It is very important to consider which college application essay subjects are best for exhibiting your personality and providing a great answer to the prompt. Find out precisely what the requirements of the prompt are. In most cases, the prompt is very complex and open to interpretation. Take enough time to meditate upon it and analyze it.

After making sure that you are aware of the precise question of the prompt, list out all of the possible topics you could approach in response to it. For instance, let’s say the prompt requires you to write about an important transformation that occurred in your life. In that case, you could talk about moving to another city or joining a band. Afterward, write for approximately ten minutes without pausing. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re able to write down all of your ideas. The brainstorming process will aid you in determining your subject and will ease up the outlining phase.

Structure Your Writing

When dealing with a college application essay, flow is crucial. This is why you need to structure your writing in a manner which doesn’t divert attention from your thoughts. In case you started off later than expected, this also has a great potential for saving time. Devise a draft of all of the ideas you wish to express in your paper. Draw inspiration from other essays. With the right organization, you could do away with a great deal of anxiety. Take a look at the following college application essay recommendations, and it will be much easier for you to get started:

  • Use description instead of narration: If you’ve taken a look at some essay examples, you’ve probably noticed that the most successful papers use description rather than provide a straightforward narration of occurrences. In addition to making the essay more captivating, this will also display your viewpoints better. Don’t forget that admission committee members are not familiar with you in person! This can be both favorable and unfavorable: favorable because you have a shot at making an awesome first impression and unfavorable if you don’t know how to sell yourself right.
  • Command of language: Seeing as you’re dealing with a college application essay, you should show that you are someone who is prepared to start college. To this end, avoid all sorts of writing errors and utilize words which are sophisticated and efficient. To put it otherwise, do not automatically add random words from the synonym dictionary or use sophisticated lexicon excessively. To augment your writing, utilize fancy terms. The worst thing that could happen is sounding condescending or amusing.
  • Be concise: Convey your ideas in as few words as you can. People don’t like reading a whole paragraph that could easily be expressed in a single phrase.
  • Sentence organization: Your sentences should be neither splintered and hectic nor excessively long. In other words, to enhance efficaciousness and flow, your sentences should be of different sizes.
  • Peer revisions: While it would be a good idea to have someone revise your paper for language and morphology mistakes, you should avoid asking too many people to look over your essay, as you may end up feeling puzzled. You should also revise the essay by yourself. A great tactic is to look at other essays and compare them to your own. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should reproduce their structure, but no one says you can’t use it as inspiration.
  • Analyze the prompt: As indicated earlier, an essential aspect to consider during the prewriting stage is analyzing the prompt. Read the following college application prompts and take a look at the manner in which we dissect them:
  • Discuss a person who has inspired you: If you’re required to talk about an individual who has exerted an impact on your life, don’t talk about famous historical figures. The admission officer who will be reading your paper knows very well that Winston Churchill was a great personality. Instead, you ought to concentrate on your own perspective. Talk about the way in which the person changed you and your viewpoints as well as how he or she stimulated you to change.
  • Why do you wish to attend this college? – This supplement question is often amazingly difficult to respond to. Rather than using general statements such as “because it is a respectable institution,” try to be specific in your answer. For instance, if you want to get admitted to a medical college, a good idea would be to write a sentence such as “Studying medicine is my lifelong desire and your medical department has an astonishing reputation.” Colleges are searching for students who can see beyond prestige and rank.
  • Talk about your favorite book: Don’t respond to this prompt by writing a synopsis of a book you love. The perfect way to go about it is to discuss the way in which the book influenced you and why you relate to it. Mention the reason for which the book defines you. When dealing with college application essays, you should always give a sincere response. Do not opt for a book simply because it’s a classic one. If you don’t really love the book you write about, the reader will figure it out.
  • Present an important extracurricular activity: This prompt offers you the chance to discuss a moment in which you learned something meaningful. Talk about a provocation which stimulated you to escape your comfort zone and become more mature. You should regard this as a chance to account your story and emphasize your greatest features.

College Application Essay Formatting Requirements

When it comes the format of your paper, comply with the following guidelines:

  • Use the Times New Roman font with 12-point letter size
  • Use double spacing
  • Margins must have the size of 1”
  • Add an indent to each paragraph
  • Last name and the page number appear at top left corner of the page
  • As a general rule, college application essays have a relatively short length (400-600 words)

Ways to Approach the Common Application

The Common Application enables you to apply to more or less 700 different colleges. Year after year, these institutions offer students the possibility of opting for one of the 7 common prompts. Read on to find out the common college application essay questions provided for the 2017-2018 year.

  • Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. [No change]
  • The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? [Revised]
  • Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? [Revised]
  • Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma – anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. [No change]
  • Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. [Revised]
  • Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? [New]
  • Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. [New]

While all of these prompts may seem like a piece of cake, at first sight, responding to them in a compelling and meaningful way is not so easy. Take a look at our ideas on how to approach each prompt:

  • Prompt 1: Write about yourself and your story. Seeing as the prompt requires you to talk about your personality, you should mention things that are special about you. Don’t talk about matters like high school achievements. Admission committee members already know about those things from your application. Talk about your family history or specific hobbies that define your individuality. Make sure you are imaginative and truthful.
  • Prompt 2: Facing obstacles. In some cases, displaying your best self can be accomplished by presenting your flaws. Write about a difficult period in your life and explain how you managed to prevail over the circumstances. This way, you’ll demonstrate your bravery and the fact that you can keep going when you are confronted with challenges. Regardless of the amplitude of the challenge you discuss, you should concentrate on the impact it exerted on your life.
  • Prompt 3: Ideas and convictions. A modification of viewpoint could represent a very intense account. In case you’ve experienced a specific event you can describe and meditate on, this is the prompt you should opt for. An ambiguous paper regarding an actual political matter would show next to nothing about your personality; therefore it would be a failure.
  • Prompt 4: An answer to an issue. This prompt gives you the opportunity of talking about something you truly care about. Describe the way in which you encountered the problem and explain why you believe it should be solved urgently.
  • Prompt 5: Maturity and insight. This might be one of the hardest prompts on the list. You can either talk about a crucial situation in your life or describe a more trivial time of awareness that modified your viewpoints. Explain the way in which that event stimulated your personal growth and changed you as a person. You should also mention what you learned from that moment.
  • Prompt 6: Keen interest. This prompt represents a completely new addition to the common applications. It offers you the possibility of talking about things that are important to you. Colleges are on the lookout for students who are concerned about the environment and like to engage in specific activities. Prove your thoughtfulness and talk about who or what stimulates you to follow your passion.
  • Prompt 7: Full liberty of answer! For this alternative, there aren’t any specific guidelines. You should choose this topic if you’ve been influenced by one of the papers you’ve written as part of other assignments, or if you have a specific question that you wish to find answers to. Keep in mind that you need to highlight your significance! Your essay should include responses to how and why questions.

A Successful Scholarship Application Essay

Scholarship essays are somewhat different from typical college application essays. Nevertheless, you should stick to the same guidelines. Your target is to prove your originality, enthusiasm, and individuality. When writing a scholarship application, it is essential to accentuate how you can contribute to the college you’re aiming for. Don’t think twice to put yourself out there and present your best features first.

Typical Varieties of College Application Essays

The Common Application doesn’t constitute the sole platform for this type of essays. A lot of institutions demand their own style. Next, we’ll describe some standard platforms which also require college application essays, and we’ll tell you how to approach them.

FSU College Application

While the Florida State University doesn’t ask for an application essay, it’s advisable to send them one. Your paper should feature less than 650 words. You ought to opt for one of the subjects listed below:

  • Talk about a personal experience that either displays your personality or helped model it.
  • Talk about a time in which you substantially contributed to other people, with the greater good in mind. Describe the provocations and recompenses of making that contribution.
  • Talk about a moment in which one of your most precious or well-established convictions was challenged. Mention the way in which you answered. Discuss the way in which the challenge modified your beliefs.

Now take a look at the prompts for the FSU Application Essay:

  • Prompt 1: Here you should discuss your hobbies, positive features, and previous experiences. Talk about all aspects that define your personality. Concentrate on a particular quality you wish to underline.
  • Prompt 2: Generosity represents a great personality feature. Concentrate on the way in which you’ve made a contribution to society and describe how you felt.
  • Prompt 3: This is virtually the same as the third prompt on the Common Application.

UC College Application

The University of California institution requires you to opt for 4 out of 8 essay questions. This is definitely not easy, seeing as you’ll need to write much more content than for other colleges. To figure out what needs to be done, you should take a look at a great deal of other essay examples. Talk about an instance of your management experience where you’ve exerted a positive impact on other people, aided them in settling conflicts or played a part in group endeavors in the course of time. Each individual has a significant part. Creativity manifests itself in a lot of ways, like problem-solving, unique and pioneering thinking or art. Talk about the way in which you demonstrate your creativity.

  • Talk about your best talent or ability and the way in which you’ve cultivated and proven that talent in the course of time.
  • Talk about how you’ve profited from an important learning opportunity or struggled to prevail over a learning impediment you’ve confronted with.
  • Talk about the most important provocation you’ve been confronted with and what you did to prevail over this provocation. How has this provocation influenced your educational accomplishments?
  • Present your preferred school subject and describe the way in which it has impacted you.
  • Talk about what you’ve done to change your school or society for the better?
  • Describe the feature that makes you stand out from the other applicants who wish to get accepted into the University of California.

Now let’s have a look at the prompts:

  • Prompts 1, 4 and 7 – You need to talk about your commitment to your surroundings. Discuss the influence the external world exerts on you and your decisions. Describe the way in which you dealt with obstacles.
  • Prompts 2 and 6 – Talk about yourself and your individuality. Present the aspects that define your personality. Reflect on your convictions and features and describe the way in which they shape your character.
  • Prompts 3, 4 and 8 – Discuss your accomplishments. Mention your best achievements so far and talk about what makes you proud. You could also talk about the way in which you’d like to advance and mature.

NHS College Application

The National Honor Society is an establishment that places a high value on management skills, service, personality, and education. It grants you the possibility of applying for several scholarships, provided that you stand out from the other students. After your nomination, you are required to forward an essay. To be successful, you need to consider several aspects. Sell yourself right! Your target is to be perceived as an exemplary applicant who appreciates knowledge and orderliness. Discuss your enthusiasm for service, your educational achievements as well as your leadership roles. Mention the aspects for which you are a powerful applicant. Provided that you give the right responses, you’re bound to get accepted into the NHS.

Rutgers College Application

To apply for RU, you need to hand in an essay. You can opt for one of the five prompts. Present an instance of your management experience in which you exerted a good impact on other people, aided in settling conflicts or made a valuable contribution to group endeavors. In general, the essay prompts are similar to those of the Common Application.

  • Prompt 1 – You need to use narrative to present an occurrence which shaped you and emphasizes your top features. Focus on the impact it exerts on you. The magnitude of the event is not of importance.
  • Prompt 2 – Talk about the way in which you influence the world around you and the people in it. This prompt is a great choice for service individuals.
  • Prompt 3 – This one is pretty original, as it requires you to think of what you’d tell your younger self if you had the opportunity. You shouldn’t talk about remorse here. Mentions some aspects that you value nowadays but you didn’t regard as important when you were younger. This prompt is an excellent way to highlight personal development.
  • Prompt 4 – Here you have a complete liberty of response. Make sure you are creative enough!

UCF College Application

While the University of Central Florida doesn’t see the essay part as mandatory, it’s advisable to turn in a paper. Your essay must include between 500 and 7000 words. You can choose to answer to any of the three questions listed below:

  • In what way have you been influenced by your family history, society or surroundings?
  • What is the reason for which you decided to apply to UCF?
  • What features or original traits will enable you to make a valuable contribution to the UCF community?

Now let’s talk about the UCF prompts.

  • Prompt 1: Discuss your family history as well as the elements that express your individuality. Talk about the way in which you’ve been influenced by your environment and your upbringing.
  • Prompt 2: Give a sincere response. Talk about why you want to attend UFC and how you can contribute to it. Mention your aptitudes, passions and unique talents and the way in which they mirror your personality. Highlight your top features.

Still Have Trouble with Your Application?

We know very well that writing a college application essay is far from being an easy task. If you don’t have enough time to complete this paper, we can offer you the right solution. At Elite Essay Writers, every single writer is proficient in drafting the perfect application essay. After placing your order, you’ll be able to talk to your writer directly at all times. This way, your paper will be incredibly personal and original. Our papers feature flawless grammar and content, and we can always make sure you get accepted to the college you wish to apply to. Hire us, and you won’t need to worry about anything!

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How to Write a Cause and Effect Essay

April 29, 2021
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The connection between causes and effects are the basis of an excellent essay. If have a difficulty finding it, our professional team is always there to help you! Writing about causes and effects helps us clarify the consequences and the roots of certain actions, circumstances, or behavior.

A cause and effect essay is based on the explanation of the causes of various things, and what we have as a result of these events – that’s what we call effects. So, writing about causes and effects helps us clarify the consequences and the roots of certain actions, circumstances, or behavior. And it also provides our vision of the world from different perspectives.

Cause and effect is a great choice for the people who want to improve their skills not only in writing but logical thinking as well. When used in English classes, this kind of writing teaches how to put the main ideas concisely and organize it following all the grammatical rules. Using cause and effect essay in History classes helps a student to trace reasons of certain historical facts and find out the results. That’s what also teaches how to think critically.

Today, there is a tendency of cause and effect essays to become more popular than the traditional five-paragraph essays. The latter was often used in the field of academic writing. There is one main problem with the five paragraph essay. Its patterns create certain boundaries for students to progress through writing more difficult types of papers. A cause and effect essay, in turn, helps students in mastering their language and writing skills making them more natural. Also, it is very helpful in creating logical ties between events. This is the main reason why cause and effect essays have become so popular in academic circles.

The Ways to Write an A-grade Cause and Effect Essay

Frequently, a cause and effect essay requires selecting an incident with a number of results that are already. Some incidents provide with the more information and can make your essay more interesting. If the facts are not strong enough, it will lead to the unclear writing hardly reminding an essay.

The more eminent the events that students choose for their paper, the more facts, reasons, and results they’ll have. It’s widely spread to choose some historical events which we know about. For American students, it can be American Civil War. Topics like this make it much easier for a student to make a thesis statement listing all the causes and effects of such a renowned event. Another widespread topic is the effects of the Civil Rights Movement. In such case, a student finds out the background, traces in details all the preconditions, and finally reaches a conclusion and the results of the event. This allows a student find the core for the analysis, having all the instruments such as dates, main events, and trends.

A student may explain it in such way: the mid-twentieth century movement was inevitable due to a social crisis and a number of discrimination cases. In the case of the American Civil War, a student can write as follows: growing strain between the Southern and the Northern states was caused by the slavery. The pro-slavery policy of the South with claims of expanding it further over the county was in high contrast with the policy of the Northern states. The possibility of slavery abolishment wasn’t an option for the Southern regions.

Make a thesis that will contain your topic of the essay in it. A cause-and-effect essay is usually written in the chronological order because it should follow a definite scheme. On the other hand, it’s possible to reverse the chronological order. You can start by describing effects. After that, it is possible to go back to the initial events that cause those effects. No matter what way you choose, you have to write reasonable topic sentences to every paragraph. Besides, each of them has to be supported by vivid details. A topic like the American Civil War presupposes a more general thesis. The main point is the possibility of conflict between two halves of the population of the same country if their views and standpoints are completely different. Then, it comes to a particular case of conflict between the North and the South. Its origin should be sought for much earlier than the War itself. The evidence is vital in this section. Besides, it should be plentiful, diverse, but never controversial.

Questions are fundamental when it comes to presenting the effects. The American Civil War results still have certain effect on the USA’s reality. Even today, it’s quite obvious. It has really changed the face of American society. Both Northern and Southern states still have their own views on the future of America and the role of the American Civil War in the country’s history. Differences in political views are still vivid in the USA, and there is no surprise that this situation is a heritage from the American Civil War. Some issues, however, weren’t solved. One of the examples a student can use is increased crime rates. Slaves that were given their freedom didn’t know what to do with it. They had no money, no master, and no work. Many of them have chosen the criminal path. These effects, as well as many others, changed the American reality forever causing conflicts over political issues even to these days. After reading the cause and effect segment, the reader has to abandon this feeling.

The Guide for Writing a Cause and Effect Essay

#1 Understanding of the theme

If you have a problem with finding out the reasons or consequences of the event/fact you’ve chosen it’s better to take a new topic for your essay. Remember that your time is limited and you don’t want to waste any of that trying to develop a wrong topic.

#2 Evidence – the more, the better!

If you want to create good logical ties in your cause and effect essay, incorporate three or four examples that fully illustrate the whole process. A good essay should be properly backed up with information.

#3 From one paragraph to another

It is a well-known fact that seamless transitions from one paragraph to another are hugely important in any type of essays.

#4 Mind the size

Unlike a five-paragraph essay, which has to be one-page long, a cause and effect essay doesn’t presuppose to have very strict and solid length rules. If you weren’t assigned to stick to a particular volume, you can make your cause and effect essay twice as long (or even longer).

#5 Success is in the details

Do not include a lot of incoherent details in your cause and effect essays. If any details don’t relate to the topic, they can mislead the reader from the point you want to make. Clearness and simplicity are of the most importance. Facts are needed to make the cause and effect connection more vivid as it is the essence of this type of essay.

Cause-and-Effect Signal Words

There are several types of signal words which can be used in such an essay. They are words expressing cause and effect (because, thus, as a result, consequently, etc.). Another group of words expresses various degrees of certainty. These are words like perhaps, certainly, possibly, etc. And finally, there is a group words showing the levels of importance, such as first, last, above all, equally, initially and others.

Our team of essay writers has already completed hundreds of cause and effect essays, as well as plenty of other papers. We definitely know how to write a top-notch essay, article or research paper. If you don’t know how to do it, or just don’t have enough time, we can help you succeed with your studies!

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How to Write Why This College Essay: Tips and Examples

April 29, 2021
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When applying to college, one finds that there are several documents to submit as an integral part of the application. Among them, there is always a personal statement essay where applicants talk about what they expect from their studies, why they chose this line of studies, and – perhaps – why they would like to study in this particular school. Some schools, however, ask their applicants to expand on the latter and write a “why this college” essay additionally. When you were writing a personal statement, you may have found out that your task only seems pretty straightforward, whereas, in reality, there are plenty of pitfalls to avoid. “Why this college” essays are similar in this regard.

Why do schools want applicants to answer such a question? More importantly, how do you answer it appropriately? In this guide, we will talk about what schools want to see in such essays, so that you were not confused about knew precisely what to write and what not to write. We will provide some topics and prompts for your “why this college” essay, so you can write it swiftly and avoid any writer’s block, as well as some hints to persuade the admission officers that you are indeed sincere in your commitment to your goal of getting an education in their school. To facilitate your writing even further, we will also provide an example of a winning “why this college” essay.

We will investigate and answer the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of asking applicants to write “why us” essays”?
  • What are the types of prompts for such essays?
  • How to make your “why this college” essay stand out?
  • How to research your “why this college” essay?
  • How to come up with a topic for a winning “why us” essay?
  • What should applicants keep in mind while writing their “why this college” essays?

THE PURPOSE OF “WHY US” ESSAYS

You can imagine how many such essays college admission officers have to read. This, in turn, allows you to imagine the amount of effort that they invest in putting together a splendid class. This is why you should apply the same effort to make sure that you only put meaningful information into your essay.

As one may guess, the purpose of “why this college” essays partially dubs the goal of personal statements. On the one hand, the admission board wants to know how well-informed you are about the school – so that they knew how well you are prepared for what comes next. On the other hand, they want to know about your expectations from their school – to know whether or not they meet your expectations and whether or not you should seek a more fitting place to realize your aspirations.

If we go into a little more detail, we can list three factors to which your reader will pay attention:

  1. What makes this college so appealing to you. In general, this may involve the school’s rich history, outstanding values, their mission which you feel inspired to follow, etc. In particular, you are expected to know about their specific approach to the academic process. Needless, to say, you also need to express your approval of all of the above.
  2. What traits make you a perfect fit for the school’s requirements and traditions. This involves your areas of interest, which may include your hobbies, and how they accord to the school’s activities. In other words, they want to know how you expect to contribute to the school – not only academically, but also in terms of the campus life.
  3. Whether or not this particular school is your right choice. As we have mentioned, the admission board also wants to know about your expectations and what you want to get out of your school years to see whether or not they can meet these expectations. Their specific approach to studies is involved here, and applicants need to be confident that it will allow them to succeed academically. This, however, includes not only studies per se, but also all sorts of the extracurricular activities, including those that may be beneficial for the applicants’ future careers. The admission officers would like to make sure that their school is precisely what students are looking for.

As you answer these questions, it will provide more in-depth insight and other benefits not only to your reader but also to yourself. First of all, researching for your essay will let you know more about the school and what awaits you there. Moreover, you will obviously want to sound excited as you describe it all in writing. By doing so, you will build up your optimism, which is essential to a splendid start of your studies there. Secondly, you will ensure that you are making the right choice by applying to this particular college. You will know exactly what to do as soon as you set your foot on campus. There is also a chance, however, that you will not find this school particularly exciting and wisely choose to apply to a place that fits your aspirations better.

CLASSIFICATION OF “WHY THIS COLLEGE” ESSAY PROMPTS

Given all of the above, you already understand that a “why this college” will have two focal points. They are “why us” and “why you.” Naturally, different colleges will have slightly or radically different expectations about “why this college” essays. Among other things, they will expect a particular balance between the “why us” and “why you” information in your essay. So, it is up to an applicant to nail this balance. Luckily, you don’t have to do it blindly. The admission officers are not interested in reading a stream of consciousness or an exercise in freewriting; so, they will give applicants a prompt to answer in their essays. This, in turn, will give students a sense of direction, necessary for spotting the right balance between those two focal points that we have discussed. The necessary balance may gear towards either of these points, and, as such, we can determine two types of “why this college” essay prompts: the “why us”-focused and the “why you”-focused ones.

Correspondingly, if the prompt tells that the admission board is more interested in hearing what you know about the school, then you give it to them and write your odes of praise to the school. If, on the other hand, the prompt asks more about you, then you need to underline your strengths and “sell” them to your reader.

When writing your essay, remember, that these two focuses are not mutually exclusive. Either way, you will be writing about what particularly drives your attention to this school. For example, if you want to learn about Time Travel and Parallel Universes from the celebrated Dr. Who, then your “why us” essay will pay more attention to how renowned a specialist Dr. Who is in the given field and what an honor it would be to have the opportunity to learn from him. On the other hand, “why you” essay may list actual achievements that make you the fittest candidate to learn from such a recognized specialist as Dr. Who.

With this particularity out of our way, let’s take a look at some examples of different types of “why this college” essay prompts, to get a clearer idea of which is which:

“Why us”:

  • Why (this school)?
  • What about this school appeals to you?
  • Why do you think that we are your right choice?
  • What is the best thing about studying with us?
  • Why do you want to continue your studies after high school at all?

“Why you”:

  • What makes you a fitting match for this school?
  • What are your interests and why do you think that being here will aid them?
  • What about our curriculum do you find most exciting?
  • What would be your contribution to our college life?
  • How do you see yourself in our school?
  • Why did you choose to send your application here?

Naturally, every college will word their prompts differently, so it makes little sense to give any real-life examples here. All you need to do is to “decipher” their wording. Be sure that it will go down to one of your formulations.

WRITING AN OUTSTANDING “WHY THIS COLLEGE” ESSAY

Regardless of the essay prompt wording, it will always come down to a trade – what you can give to the university and what you expect in return. When we speak about writing, it is all about enumerating the advantages that the success of your application will grant applicants and the school (and sounding sincerely optimistic about it).

How do you do this? How do you comprehensively list all the shining opportunities that open not only before you but before the school in case of your successful enrollment? Importantly, how do you achieve this in such a modest-sized text (typically, about 500 words in two paragraphs)?

To answer these questions, we will have to walk you through each step applicants need to take to write a winning “why this college” essay. Surely, you have already written essays before, so you should know that your work on any essay should begin with a thorough research, and this type of essay is no exception. Then, formulate your topic in a way that will correspond to your writing aspirations – in other words, make up your mind about what exactly you would like to write in this small piece of text. Only then, move on to writing itself. Let us take a closer look at each of these steps:

STEP 1: Researching for “why this college” essay

Just the same as with any other essay, applicants need to be familiar with the subject-matter about which they are to write. In this case, it is the college to which they are applying to. So, where students can find this information? And, more importantly, if this information is already well-known, how do you make it sound genuine and exciting in your essay? As a matter of fact, the information about any given school is always available to applicants, but so you don’t need to overthink it, we will list the ways you can get this information:

  • Visiting the campus. All schools are interested in attracting as many applicants as they possibly can. For this purpose, they advertise themselves. Among other ways in which they do it is offering potential applicants guided tours. Embarking on such a tour is often an exciting undertaking in itself. But if you go there, with all the fun that you may be having, you need to remember that you are on a mission to collect data about the school. So, be equipped to take notes. For that, you can use either a pen and a paper, or your smartphone. The essential information that you write down should include your tour guide’s name, a few facts about the school that caught your attention (these can be surprising, funny, or just inspiring and uplifting), and, of course, some general facts – the architecture and looks, the most important points in the school’s history, college traditions, etc. Mind that while you are on this tour, you can obtain valuable information not only from your tour guide. You may try and exchange a few words with the students or even professors about how they enjoy being there, what was their initial impression of the school and whether it persisted, was there anything about the college life that took them aback and to which they had to adjust, etc. In fact, if you already have your “why this college” essay prompt, you can simply paraphrase it and ask them that. Don’t rely on your memory, be sure to have their answers written down!
  • Visiting the campus virtually. It may happen that the school you are applying to is too geographically remote from the place where you live. There may also be other objective reasons why you cannot take a guided tour of your target school. Fortunately, today’s technologies can help remote applicants out. Simply go to your school’s website and find a virtual tour around their campus. Alternatively, look for virtual tours on such online resources as youniversitytv.com, campustours.com, or even YouTube. Colleges also often ask some of their students to provide their contact data on college websites. So, here is your way to connect with students remotely and ask them whatever you have to ask. Once again, you may even paraphrase your essay prompt and ask them that.
  • Interviewing an alumnus. Alumni interviews are not an uncommon practice. Interviewing an alumnus of the school to which you are applying is a perfect chance to get all the information about this school. Formulate your questions in a way which will allow getting all the information you need, including your essay prompt answer. Of course, remember to take notes!
  • Attending college fairs. All high school students who wish to continue their studies at college are encouraged to attend college fairs, facilitating their choice of school. Students who have already made up their minds about the school they are applying to may feel like there is no need to attend such events. Nevertheless, attending college fairs can still prove beneficial for the applicants. Most people who attend such fairs just pick a pile of brochures and go home. This should not be your case. Even though brochures and other hand-out materials are valid research material for a “why this college” essay, do not limit yourself to that info. The people at your college’s stand at a fair are usually volunteering students who should be friendly to the fair attendants. You can use it for your benefit and ask them all the questions that we have discussed above. Once again, don’t forget to take notes!
  • Looking through college’s brochures and course catalogs. As we have mentioned, schools are interested in attracting significant numbers of applicants, and this is why they advertise. Aside from the means of advertisement we have already discussed, there are the colleges’ own published materials, including brochures and course catalogs. You can find them both in online and printed form. One thing that they always include is the school’s mission statement, which reflects their philosophy of education. You can see whether (or how exactly) it corresponds to your goals and expand upon it in a “why this college” essay. By expanding we mean underlining how one or two particular classes and activities are custom-designed for you. It may be tempting to simply paraphrase their description, but you should know that it will not work. Your interest needs to be sincere and genuine, and, as such, you should take an original approach to the issue – for example, you can focus on a particular professor(s) that you find appealing professionally and academically.
  • Reading the alumni magazine. Alumni magazines may seem like something too specific to fall under an applicant’s interest, but this is a misconception. When reading such a magazine, you may come across a professor’s work that you find particularly inspiring or even read about the school’s vision of its future which you share, to which you can connect, and in which you vividly see yourself. For example, you may find yourself particularly inspired by the school’s plans to build a brand new top-notch engineering school which you sincerely hope to join. Another helpful materials are the alumni testimonials where they go into detail about their aspirations which led them to this school and how true to life these aspirations turned out to be, – this is quite an effective source of inspiration for this kind of essay!

Reading the campus newspaper. For now, this is the closest thing to this school’s campus experience. This is a unique opportunity to get more insight into the campus life as it is – what troubles the students, what they are happy about, what career and extracurricular opportunities they have, and other topical issues. So, it would be a shame to miss such an opportunity.

Following the school’s social media profiles. Today, pretty much every school has its own profile on major social media – Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. There, they post about everything that happens on the campus: new construction expansions, anniversaries of particular events in school history, announcements about the school’s regular and one-time events, etc. This is another unique opportunity to get more insightful information about how the school lives, so miss out on those.

Just googling your school. Same as with any other research, just looking up the information on the Internet can prove to be helpful. Wikipedia, for example, often provides insightful articles about renowned colleges, including their history, traditions, plans, etc. You can also google something like “what is (this college) really like” and find student forums where they will most likely discuss all the relevant issues sincerely and in great detail.

STEP 2. Formulating your “why this college” essay topic

Now that you have conducted some substantial research about your school, you should possess a considerable amount of information on the subject-matter. During the research, you have surely come across some particularly relatable and inspiring points about your school. These are the points you should address in “why this college” essay.

These points may come from any of the sources used during the research – hints found online, the information you have gathered while on campus, insights from your conversations with students and those you have “overheard” from their conversations on forums and through the college newspaper, etc.

Surely, you have followed our advice and took notes about everything meaningful that you have learned. What you should do now is look through all these notes and pick up to five points that are the most exciting and relatable to the school’s philosophy, environment, and life in general. They also have to be the ones on which you can expand in a way that reveals a direct connection of these details of campus life. You will be able to use them in your essay regardless of whether the prompt demands a “why us” or a “why you” approach.

Out of these five points, pick one that you will make into the topic of your “why this college” essay. How do you pick just one? To do this, go back to the fundamental question of a “why this college” essay – what makes you personally relatable to this particular school and the things for which it stands. Having conducted significant research, you surely have a lot of genuine things to share. Obviously, they will be more specific than the general sentences like “the historical buildings of the campus are all architectural masterpieces and a sheer pleasure to look at” or “the liberal arts curriculum here is some of the most progressive in the country.” While the admission officer who reads this may find such compliments pleasant, they do not represent your connection to this college and, as such, do not achieve the purpose of a “why this college essay,” because they can be said about plenty of schools across the country. Instead, talk something characteristic of this school specifically. In other words, discuss things that only this school can offer, and that make this school stand out among others.

When you think about these individual features of your target school, you should have a vivid and colorful picture of how you will describe them in your essay. Do not get too emotional about it, though; remember that a “why this college” essay is not required to be 100% objective. Quite the contrary, it should be a personal piece of writing. Just singing odes of praise is not your goal here. Instead, focus more on the reasons why you find this school so extraordinary.

These reasons must form connection points between you and the school, and, as such, they should be personal, perhaps even intimate. For instance, if you write about academic aspects, like particular courses or professors, you can try and find a way to connect them not only to your abstract aspirations but also to your past experiences and/or accomplished activities that substantiate them.

We cannot stress enough that this cannot be general and superficial. For example, you cannot state that you want to get enrolled in this school because it is located in a city and you want to move to that city. Every town has a college or even several to which you could apply, but you chose this particular one – why? You cannot just state that the architecture of the campus buildings is inspiring. Every school seeks to make its architecture stand out; so, explain how this particular architecture inspires you to pursue your academic and other life goals. Simply good weather or any other geography-related factor also does not suit if it can equally be applied to a bunch of other places.

So, once you have made up your mind about these five (or less) specific points, it is time to formulate your possible “why this college” essay topics around them. The first thing you need to keep in mind is that they need to be easily paraphrase-able depending on whether your prompt suggests a “why us” or “why you” essay, which, as you already know, are merely different sides of the same coin. Understanding this principle and following it will help formulate your “why this college” essay topic even before getting the prompt, thus winning a little more time for writing the essay itself. In other words, you should be able to word your essay topic either in “why us” or in “why you” key, depending on the essay prompt.

For instance, a “why us” essay topic and the corresponding essay may focus on how innovative and game-changing a particular engineering project is, and how perfectly it coincides with what you would like to achieve or to what you would like to contribute. A “why you” essay topic and the corresponding essay, on the other hand, will talk about the same issues but from a different perspective. It will focus on what you would like to achieve academically and professionally and how it makes you the perfect person for a particular project that your school pursues or plans to pursue. In other words, “why us” and “why you” are essentially nothing more than different parts of the same equation.

We realize that it all may sound just a tad confusing, so here are a few examples of both types of “why this college” essay topics:

“WHY US”:

  • How I expect my studies here to benefit my career plans
  • The college’s unique philosophy of education in your desired major. The genuine combination of disciplines comprising this major at this college. How they correspond to your academic experiences and interests
  • The school’s innovative way of connecting the disciplines and how it relates to your own philosophy of education
  • The school’s policy regarding students from underprivileged backgrounds. How you can benefit from it and/or contribute to it
  • A story about your acquaintance with this college. What impressed you and how did you come to realize that this is where you want to continue your education
  • Your initial negative impression about the school and how it proved to be wrong. Did you come across some facts that changed your original impression during some research? Was it debunked in a conversation with someone well-informed? Did you come across an article or a report about the school’s recent activities that appealed to you?
  • Particular details your conversations with this college’s students that were funny/ surprising/ inspiring that left you with an excellent impression and contributed to your decision to apply here
  • Any particularly meaningful incident that you have experienced during a campus tour. Was the tour guide overwhelmingly convincing? Did you come across some surprising information?
  • Did anything happen that transformed your understanding of college life in general?
  • Particular aspects of school history to which you relate personally. Was the school one of the pioneers to teach women or ethnic minorities? Has it always been promoting international students exchange? Has the school administration taken an unpopular but morally right decision at some critical point in national, regional, or school’s history?
  • A particular professor whom you consider your role model and can’t wait to learn from him or her. Has this professor influenced a science or any other project that you did at high school?
  • Have some of this professor’s publications revolutionized your understanding of any particular problem or issue?
  • A specific class that only this college offers that teaches something in what you would like to specialize in your studies and future career
  • A unique facility (laboratory, observatory, etc.) that you find impressive and would like to work with it. Specific equipment that only few schools employ in their education process. An outstanding library that has some unique ancient scrolls in its possession
  • How the school’s education process uniquely utilizes a specific set of skills and knowledge that you have. How different it is from the common understanding of education. How the school unites large groups of students for completing massive projects

“WHY YOU”

  • A project that you have started working on back in high school and wish to continue. The current stage of this project’s development. How you can use the school’s facilities to commence your work on this project. How well it fits into one of the school programs or courses
  • Your social involvement in high school. How you can continue being socially involved when you get enrolled into this college, how you can contribute to the campus life
  • Your hobbies and extracurricular activities which you will keep doing when at college. For example, arts, music, journalism, etc. How inspiring the environment at this campus is for this particular activity
  • Background details that make you outstandingly qualified for a particular internship program. For example, your past experience of working in this or similar field, your preliminary exposure to this or similar line of work through your relatives or friends, etc.
  • An international student exchange program that this school has. How qualified you are to take benefit from this program because you are fluent in the target country’s language and/or fascinated with its culture. The international aspect of your desired career
  • How you are particularly interested in and well-fitting for a research project that the school is conducting. How well it ties in with a research project that you did and enjoyed doing in high school. How the professor who is in charge of this project is an inspiration to you. How you consider research as one of your top career options
  • A particular activity that is currently non-existent on this school’s campus that you can organize or help to organize because you have expertise and experience coordinating such activities in high school. For example, a club dedicated to particular sports or other interests. If you choose to write on this topic, make sure that the school indeed does not already have such a club
  • If the school already has a club to which you can contribute a great deal (because of your outstanding experience and expertise), explain what exactly you can bring to the table
  • Paraphrase or expand upon your personal statement. This essay is your opportunity to talk more about your strong sides and talents or highlight the skills that you had to exclude from your personal statement because of word count limitations. It can be a follow-up to your personal statement. Explain how these strong sides or talents perfectly fit into the school’s academic and/or extracurricular activities

There is always a chance that your dream school will not accept your application. Regardless of their reasons to do so, it is always wise to have a plan B or even several of those. This means that all applicants are strongly advised to apply to more than one college. If your “Plan B” school also demands that you write a “why this college” essay, then, in view of the fact that they are your plan B, the topic for your essay may be one of the following:

  • Focus on how getting a degree will help you achieve your career goals. Talk about how great you will be at your desired job after you graduate
  • The school’s philosophy and values and their connection points with your personal philosophy and values. For example, you are a vegan and this school is famous for vegan cafeterias. You are green-conscious, and this school makes a point about being green and cooperates with local farms for this cause. The school’s active inclusion of ethnic and/or other minorities, etc.
  • Basically anything that you find exciting about this school. If you have a hard time coming up with such a thing, then you probably should not apply to this school

As we have mentioned, “why this college” essays are always limited in volume. They should not be over two paragraphs long or over 500 words long. There are topics that you cannot possibly cover in such a modest word count. These are the “NO” topics for “why this college” essays:

  • The school’s reputation or any general feature characteristic of many schools. Schools may differ, but they are all essentially the same. So, no general features (such as the school’s reputation or the weather in the school’s locality) are good topics for such an essay, unless these features are absolutely unique. For example, if your school is very specialized and has a small number of students (like the Webb Institute, for instance), you can talk about how you find it comfortable and inspiring to work and live in a small community
  • If you are a fan of the school’s sports team, it is also not a splendid idea to write about it in your essay for two reasons. First, it is overused. Second, rooting for the school’s team does not require being at this school. You can only talk about this if you can actively contribute to the team as an athlete, mascot, cheerleader, etc.
  • Paraphrasing the nice words which the school says about itself on their website or in the brochure. This is not original information, so your essay will have no value for the reader and will leave them disappointed upon reading it. If some information from those sources appealed to you, you need to explain why you relate to it
  • College rankings. It is also not original information. Your reader is already aware of the college reputation. Moreover, if this is your top reason for applying here, it will make the admission officer feel like all you want to do is piggybacking on the school’s existing reputation without contributing to it, and nobody likes that. Besides, there are many schools with an excellent reputation in any line of studies, so rankings do not make any school stand out for an applicant
  • Going too deep about why you chose this major. This would be in direct conflict with the very definition of a “why this college” essay. Your task is to write why you want to study at this school, not to write why you want to study this subject
  • Going too poetic about your impressions of the campus. All schools struggle to look nice, and they often use the same means for this. It is not a unique feature of any school. So, writing about it in a “why this college” essay is a waste of volume

STEP 3: The writing process

Once you have picked the perfect topic for your essay, you can consider that the most challenging part of the process is over. All that is left to do is to put your excitement with the school into words. Here are a few things to keep in mind when you are writing your essay:

  • Stick to the point and avoid expansive introductions. We cannot stress enough that these essays are very limited in volume, so you should stay laconic and cut off everything that’s not necessary. This includes both the introduction and the conclusion. If you find it tough to write an essay without those, then write them in your draft and cut them off later. Your main body paragraphs (no more than two) should include your most exciting reasons for applying and nothing more
  • Don’t overthink what your reader wants to see in your essay. Sincerity is the key to writing a genuine essay
  • Be specific about everything you mention and include as much factual data as you can: names of professors, classes, clubs, etc.
  • Mention that you will indeed go to this college if you get accepted. You may think that it goes without saying, but it doesn’t. It is essential for the admission board to be sure that you will indeed show up at the beginning of your first semester. That is, of course, if this is your sincere intention – if it’s not, then don’t write it.
  • If you apply to more than one college, you may be tempted to write just one “why this college” essay. This is a big no-no. For one, you might just forget to change a few specifics and send the wrong essay to the wrong school. But even if you are extra careful and cautious, schools are never identical, – so, the only way to write an essay that will fit more than one school is to generalize, and we have gone into great detail explaining why you should avoid this in “why this college” essays
  • If you find yourself stumbling or in some sort of a writer’s block, you can check out some general essay-writing guides – for example, WikiHow is full of those

“WHY THIS COLLEGE” ESSAY EXAMPLE

To sum everything up, we would like to provide an example of a winning “why this college” essay and explain why it works:

“Stanford has been hosting a football game in which I participated as a part of my school’s team. I am an athlete, but I have quite a few more interests than sports. As such, during my time at Stanford, I got the opportunity not only to check out and enjoy the college’s football facilities but also to exchange a few words with the students. A few words quickly turned into fervent discussions of so many topics that interest me – from Asian geography to efficient movement patterns. Not only the topics themselves have inspired and excited me, but the ardor with which the other guys were talking about them. I felt like we have known each other for years! This is exactly the kind of environment in which I would be happy to continue my studies.

I have looked into the programs and activities at Stanford, and I was glad to find out about the Stanford Entrepreneurs Club because this gives me an excellent opportunity to go on pursuing my interest on the subject-matter: currently I am an active member of a similar club at my high school. As such, I would like to take an Entrepreneurial Leadership minor alongside my Computer Science major.”

Here are the reasons why this “why this college” essay is a winning one:

  • The applicant begins with mentioning that he has already begun building connections with other students, thus starting his integration into the campus life
  • He states that he already feels included, thus revealing confidence in both the rightness of his choice to study at Stanford and the success of his application
  • He is specific about how exactly he got to connect with students by mentioning the topics that they have discussed
  • He explains what he particularly likes about Stanford and why: he participates in his high school entrepreneur’s club and feels strongly inclined to contribute to the similar club at college. He also mentions that he is specifically interested in Entrepreneurial Leadership
  • He reveals awareness about the college curriculum
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How to Write a Good Application Letter

April 29, 2021
Posted by

Other than your degrees, an application letter is equally essential for you to get the job you want. However, writing one can be difficult, especially if you have never written an application letter before. But worry not, we are here to help you.

What is an Application Letter?

When you apply for a job, you are often asked to send an application letter with your resume.

A resume details your past work experience, your accomplishments, and your skills. Unlike a resume, an application letter, or a cover letter, details the reason why you have qualified the position and why the company should be interested in inviting you for an interview.

How to Get Started

When you write a job application letter, you need to present information that will increase your likelihood of being picked for the interview. You may be tempted to put in all the information in the letter, but you should also understand that space is limited. Your potential employer has even less time to spend reading your job application letter.

The first thing you need to do is to find out what the employer wants, and then customize your application accordingly. You can find out what they want by looking at their job advertisements. When you know what they want, you can include relevant information according to those needs. For instance, if the job requires leadership skills, mention the times when you have led a team and achieved success as a leader.

General Guidelines

Obviously, writing an application letter is much harder than writing an email to your friend or your colleague. Your potential hiring manager or interviewer expects you to write your application letter in a particular form. That means you need to consider how the letter would look to them. For that, you need to consider the following:

  • Length: Should not be more than one page
  • Font: Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, or other traditional fonts. The font size can range from 10 to 12 points.
  • Format: Single-spaced, a space between each paragraph. 1-inch margins and align the text to the left.
What You Should Say in Each Section of the Letter

When you write an application letter, you need to remember the rules to each section of it. The rule for each section is different from another.

  • Heading: For this part, you should start with the contact information of both you and your employer such as name, address, phone number, and email). Next, put on the date. Do note, however, that if it is an email instead of a letter, then you should write your contact information at the end of the letter, after your signature.
  • Salutation: Here, you put in your greeting. Needless to say that you should be as polite as possible. If you do not know what salutation to use, then “Dear Mr.” or “Ms.” Followed by the person’s last name is good enough. However, if you are unsure of the reader’s gender, then you can state their full name and avoid the personal title altogether.
  • Body: Things are much more complicated here since this is where you will include all of the necessary information. Think of this as the main course of the application letter. To explain this part better, we will divide this into three parts.
    • First paragraph: Mention the position you are applying for as well as where you saw the job listing.
    • The following paragraph(s): Here, you will include all the relevant information. We mentioned about doing your research about what your employer is looking for. This is where such knowledge comes in handy. You will need to explain how your skills are exactly what your employer is looking for.
    • The final part: This is where you will put the “Thank you” to the employer. Then add your name. Here, you can also include follow-up information.
  • Complimentary close: Here, you sign off your email with a polite close. Using “Best” or “Sincerely” before your name is good enough.
  • Signature: If you are writing a letter, then end it with your handwritten signature. Then put your typed name. If you are writing this in an email, put in your typed name followed by your contact information.

Tired of Formatting Rules? Use Templates!

It is entirely understandable that all of the rules about formatting are overwhelming, if not unnecessary. For that reason, there are numerous templates out there for your job application letter. In fact, you can find one in your Microsoft Office application on your PC. You can save a lot of time writing your application letter if you use an existing template. All you need is to put in the information without worrying about whether or not your format is correct in the first place.

Proofread Your Letter

Your employer can tell at a glance whether you will be a good employee based on how you write your application letter. Grammar mistakes or typographical errors in your application is a sign of negligence. We should stress that the information of the company and the employer (such as their name) need to be correct. If you get them wrong, then your employer will see it as a red flag. You don’t want them to see you as a negligent individual. So, make sure you get them right.

Plus, if the job requires creativity (marketing, for example), then you can try to demonstrate how creative you can be under strict guidelines. However, do take into consideration the position and the company you are applying to before you attempt to stray from the guideline.

Other Tips on Good Application Letters

Be direct: First impression is everything. Your first paragraph should be short and to-the-point. We already mentioned that your application letter should not be longer than a page. Therefore, you need to put in as many relevant information as possible. You need to make that the information in a single page counts. Beating around the bush is not going to land you that job. Start off by explaining why you are writing the application letter. Tell them about the job title and company name. Plus, mention how you found the job listing. If you want to, you can mention why you are the best candidate for the position. However, you need to be brief.

The application letter complements the resume: You are often required to send an application letter with a resume. Your employer doesn’t want to read the same paper twice, so you can try to make your application letter to be an extension of your resume. While you can just make your application letter a duplicate of the resume, you will have a higher chance of being interviewed if you do otherwise. In your application letter, you can add personal touches such as language. You can explain a tad more about your career and work experience in a more personal tone. Bullet points don’t reveal much of the character. A story does.

Prove yourself: Remember that you are applying for a job. Your first step is sending your resume and cover letter to your employer to review. The second step is getting an interview with that employer. The third and final step is getting offered the job. Keep that in mind when you write your application letter. Your application letter should ensure that you get the job. Therefore, you should include details about relevant experience and background that prove why you are the best candidate for the position. Explain to them how your previous jobs gave you the experience for the position you are applying for. Explain to them how you would contribute to the company if you get hired. Make your application letter convincing.

Close with the relevant details: Here, you should include a “Thank you.” You can also include your contact information or inform them of how you will follow up. That way, your employer doesn’t need to look through the entire paper if he or she wants to contact you.

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It’s all in the outline: mastering the compare and contrast essay

April 29, 2021
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Writing clearly and concisely is one of the most important skills that you can learn and develop while you are still in school. Learning to write an effective essay teaches you to investigate, interpret, and communicate information, which will serve you later in life. All good essays, including narrative; compare and contrast; descriptive; argumentative; expository; cause and effect; and persuasive essays begin with an outline that will help you to organize your ideas. Creating an outline before you even start a rough draft will help you to organize your ideas, identify gaps that need to be filled in, and help you to write with ease. Here are some tips on writing an effective outline for an essay, which will help you master writing for a good grade now and communicating effectively in a job later on in life.

WRITING AN OUTLINE AND WHY IT IS IMPORTANT

Do you need to look at how two ideas, subjects, or topics are alike or different? Well, you are writing a compare and contrast essay. A compare and contrast essay is not just comparing two subject matters. It is more than that. To write an effective compare and contrast essay outline, keep in mind:

  • You must establish that one subject is primary over another.
  • You must clear up and explain common misconceptions about both subjects.
  • You must give ideas on how to do or understand something differently.
  • You must talk about something unknown about the subject and explain it.
  • You must support your facts with reliable sources that provide accurate information.

There are many ways to organize your ideas into an outline for a compare and contrast essay. Here are some to get you started.

ORGANIZING A COMPARE AND CONTRAST ESSAY

Use this organizational outline when you are comparing related subjects, or if you have to identify a few “points” when evaluating them. In each paragraph, you will write your introductory sentence, write about the first subject and all of its details, and then write about the second subject and its details. The next paragraph will compare another point and how the subjects are related to that point, and so on. Each paragraph speaks on one point of comparison while comparing the two subject matters.

ORGANIZING A COMPARE AND CONTRAST ESSAY BY ITEM

What do you do when two subject matters that are completely different from one another (like apples and dragons) or deal with multiple points of comparison? If this is the case, try writing a compare and contrast essay outline organized by item, not points.

When comparing two completely different subject matters, both may not fit within a particular topic or criteria (again, think apples and dragons). When you need to evaluate two different subjects, you want to ensure that your ideas are clear so the reader can follow along. Each body paragraph gives you the opportunity to explore each subject area in depth, and not focus on trying to find connecting concepts. Following your explanation of the subject matter, you can then write two following paragraphs: one examining the similarities between the topics and one explaining the differences.

Once you have completed your outline, the rough draft will flow nicely. Your essay is already pretty much written, now you just need to write your sentences and compose the paragraphs, based on methods of organization that you have chosen.

HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE AND COMPELLING OPENING

The introduction of a compare and contrast essay does not vary much from other types of essays. You still need to introduce your topic, communicate what you attempting to compare and contrast, and capture the reader’s attention.

All introductions have three main components:

  • You must introduce the main idea. Hook the reader in with a sentence that is about the topic. Different methods of doing this include opening with a question the reader can relate to, a quote about the topic, or an anecdote which opens the essay with a story.
  • You must name the subjects that you are attempting to distinguish or compare. Don’t get into the specifics just yet, just mention the topics that you will be evaluating throughout the essay.
  • You must write a thesis statement. This is the most crucial part of any essay because all topic sentences will have to relate back to the thesis. The thesis statement tells the reader the main point of your essay. It should be clear, concise, one sentence long, and must tell the audience exactly what you are trying to say in your essay.

Once you have completed the introduction and formulated an excellent thesis statement, you can start composing the body of your compare and contrast essay, which will provide proof your reader needs to agree or disagree with.

HOW TO WRITE EFFECTIVE BODY PARAGRAPHS IN A COMPARE AND CONTRAST ESSAY

The length of your essay and number of body paragraphs you have depends on how many points you have, or how many different topics you are attempting to compare and contrast under your subject area. If, you are only comparing two things (apples and dragons) you only need two main body paragraphs. If you are comparing apples, dragons, and boats, you will need three paragraphs. The number of different aspects that you need to contrast may be assigned by your teacher (or customer if you are doing this for a job), or you may need to use your creative juices and figure this out for yourself.

If you are running short on ideas of what criteria you can compare and contrast, you can always brainstorm by using a Venn diagram. Draw two overlapping circles. The larger circles will be your contrast, and the shape they share in the middle will be your similarities. This is an effective tool that will help you create new, fresh perspective to use in your writing. Remember, three criteria are usually enough for a compare and contrast essay (unless you are instructed to do otherwise).

When you work on your Venn diagram, and after you begin researching the reliable sources, you may find that you have too many ideas to work with. To keep your essay clear and concise, ask yourself the following questions:

  • What is the teacher or client specifically asking me for?
  • Is the information I want to include relevant to their request?
  • What is going to be engaging for the reader?
  • What is the most informative data that the reader doesn’t already know?
  • Is it relevant and important to the point I am trying to make?

The topic sentence is one of the most important parts of your body paragraph. Not only does it introduce what the paragraph is about, it relates to your thesis statement. Each topic sentence focuses on one topic or criterion, explaining what you are trying to compare and contrast.

After you craft your topic sentence, you need to support your thoughts with evidence. You can use data, statistics, case studies and a variety of other details that you find in your reliable resources. An essay is about explanation and evaluation, not just listing the similarities and differences about each topic.

There are many words that you can use to connect your ideas and show how you are comparing or contrasting your topics. Here are just some, for inspiration:

  • Similar to
  • Although
  • However,
  • In common
  • Either…or
  • On the contrary,
  • Neither…nor
  • Otherwise
  • Just as
  • Differ from

Be careful to avoid bias or judgment when writing. It is up to the reader to make their own evaluation. Your job is to present the facts in a fair way, and that will keep the audience reading.

SUM UP YOUR ESSAY WITH A GOOD CONCLUSION

The easiest part of your essay to write is the conclusion because you are just summing up what you have already written. Plus, you need to make sure that it is well organized. There are three parts to the conclusion (much like an introduction but instead of introducing you are summarizing) that you need to incorporate in your compare and contrast essay:

  • The summary sentence tells the reader what points you made during your essay. Do not start this sentence with “in conclusion.”
  • Evaluate the information you presented in your essay and offer the reader an analysis.
  • Write a final sentence which clarifies the main point of your essay. What is the whole purpose of writing it? Just a suggestion, don’t tell the reader you wrote it “because it was an assignment.”

THE FINAL STEP: EDIT YOUR PAPER TO PERFECTION

Editing your rough draft is crucial to producing a good compare and contrast essay. After you organize your ideas and write them into paragraphs, you now need to edit for grammar mistakes and content.

Sometimes it is difficult to read your own writing and pick up on typos and mistakes that you make. You have been immersed in the information, and you tend to read each sentence like you wrote it without picking out the errors. One way to go about editing your paper is to read from the last sentence to the first sentence. That way, you are looking at how each sentence looks, not how the sentences flow into one another. First, read for content. Make sure that your sentences are clear, and your ideas are presented well. Then, you can start looking for capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and syntax. If you can rewrite the sentence so that it is clearer, do it. You are aiming to write the perfect essay!

Don’t let tools such as the grammar check on Microsoft Word or online programs like Grammarly be your only source for checking your work. They aren’t 100% reliable, and you need to practice the skills needed to write and edit a good paper. You can use them after you have edited your own work, just as a backup, but don’t rely solely on these tools to do the work for you. You can always ask someone else to read your compare and contrast essay and provide feedback to your content or proofread for editing errors.

Don’t forget, if you use any information for your essay that comes from another source, make sure that you include them in your reference or works cited section. This is usually a whole separate page. There are a variety of formats that you can follow, but it is important for the reader to be able to look up your sources to make sure the information that you have given is reliable.

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How to Write the Common Application Essays

April 29, 2021
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Common Application Essays: Writing the Perfect Essay

If you’re looking to apply to university, thankfully, technology has made it much easier – it’ll be most convenient for you to apply using the Common Application system. Almost 700 colleges are currently using the Common Application system, making it easy to apply to a multitude of colleges using only a single form. This system can even provide you with an adequate help, financial aid, and relevant information, while streamlining the college application process. Just this year, Common Application (CA) have provided a few different revised essay prompts and amendments to other prompts, with a total of three new prompts revisions and two completely new prompts. You can take these prompts on board and build your essays with them.

We understand that this may be one of the most important essays of your life and so this can be quite a daunting task – it’s as if you have one opportunity to make a difference to the rest of your career here, however, you shouldn’t worry! Fortunately for aspiring students, we’ve come up with some great tips, strategies, and advice to help you with the essay section of the application process. We’ll explore some of the prompts and give you ways in which you can tackle that critical essay. It’s not going to be a walk in the park, but we’ll certainly help walk and talk you through it.

Hopefully, after you’ve read this article, it’ll be smooth sailing to your respective college of choice! Let’s begin.

Overview

So what is the purpose of the CA essay? Colleges that you’re applying to will be able to get a good representation of your skills and personal attributes through the prose you’ll supply. Everything from your grades and past results will be available to colleges but the CA essay process is a bit different to this. Rather than a qualitative representation of what you’re about, the CA essay gives you an opportunity to showcase your personality and flare as a potential student. Through the essay, one is able to express their unique qualities and what matters most to them, so you should strive to do just this.

Through the online application system, your essay is going to be shown to various colleges so you won’t be able to tailor it towards different degree applications, making life a lot simpler. This is why you’ll need to write your essay so that it is accessible by a number of universities for a wide range of subjects.

Let’s Talk Strategy

The CA essay is not like an academic paper – it’s only 650 words, not 6500 words. We know that it can appear daunting because you’ll probably want to be shouting at your college with all the wonderful things about you, but soon you’ll find out that college writing is all about refinement and organising text in a clear and thought out manner, so this is what you’ll want to consider.

Develop Ideas

Before you can begin to approach some essay prompts, it’s important to brainstorm your core passions. Concentrate on something you’re passionate about and then think of the ways you connect with it. What makes you resonate with your core passion? If your core passion is creative writing, think about how you can make this come across. Perhaps you love the idea of expressing emotion, creative learning, discovery, portraying characters or bringing your life experiences to the table. Give your core passions scrutiny and a real think.

After you’ve taken a moment to determine your passion, you now have a strong purpose to write a CA essay. For every CA essay, there are four essential things that colleges will be looking to read about:

1. Who you are.

This goes a bit further than your name and contact details – readers are interested in your key personality elements that make you shine. This is above all, a personal showcase.

2. Why you are here.

This is not an indication to discuss existential philosophy. We’re not looking as to answer questions on the origins of life. Whoever is reading wants to know about your journey through high school and how you’ve developed, matured and grown as a person to want to attend college.

3. What makes you unique.

It is important for colleges to understand how you can fit in and how you’ll be able to bring value to a degree programme. Think about your tangible skills, soft skills, problem-solving skills, and any other personality traits that may distinguish you from others – you’ll need to show how you’re unique throughout.

4. What matters to you.

In the end, you’ll need to relate back to where your passions lie. This will help essay recipients understand more about your personality and if you’d fit in at a college.

Every individual is different and every college can be impressed by a multitude of things. The “one true passion” or “correct passion” don’t exist – whatever you’re into, you should express it. Use the four statements above to guide you through this process and through all of the essay prompts we’ll be looking at throughout this article.

Organizing Ideas and Writing

Besides the word count, there are really very limited guidelines for what’s expected of your CA essay, leaving you the freedom to exercise creativity in your approach, writing structure, and style. Obviously, this doesn’t mean you should write a big splurge of text – you’ll need to be logical and the context must follow what the title asks. Ideas need to flow smoothly together to provide that perfect essay that’s going to make you stand out.

Style

Now that you’re a prospective student, or a college graduate in the making, you’re going to need to impress them with a mature level of style in order to set your essay apart from the others. Needless to say, you’ll be expected to write with a good grammatical command and well thought out structure throughout, because the university level is set high. As for your use of language, don’t worry, we’re not talking Ernest Hemingway level here but rather a clear piece of text that’s logically set out and has some creative flair – this is what admissions officers will be looking for.

So how can you write with great style?

  • Show, don’t tell. This is a great stylistic move you can make to get the reader thinking about what you’re trying to tell them. You can use less adjectives and more poetry to guide the reader into trying to interpret ideas in the same way as you. To take an example, “the sun is shining” can be changed to “the enormous heated sphere is blaring in the sky”. A blatantly obvious description can lead to a pointless essay.
  • Avoid using cliches. Readers are hardly going to be impressed with statements such as “I woke up and it was all a dream”. This could have been written by anybody and it doesn’t showcase anything about you as a person. Look up some popular cliches online if you’re not familiar.
  • Avoid using vague statements. It’s time to become refined and demonstrate skill in writing. Plus, you don’t have the number of words to go on forever!
  • Write using the active voice. This is the grammatical rule whereby the subject acts upon a verb. It will bode well in essays rather than numerous passive sentences.
  • Write in a mature tone. You don’t want to come across like a spoilt child, someone who’s a cynic or a pessimist. A positive tone will bode well for an application. You don’t want to be arrogant either and flaunt that you have everything it takes, so if you’ve got a big ego, suppress it for the time being. Think about how to come across in a professional and dignified manner. Your CA essay reader is going to want to see a level of maturity so that you’ll be the best fit for their college.

Whatever you decide to do, do NOT resort to using your thesaurus to colour your language to provide a pointless overly complicated plethora of adjectives. Remember that this essay is not a test to show off an extensive range of vocabulary. An overuse of your thesaurus displays a lack of skill and is easily recognisable by the essay recipient, so if you’re going to use it, use it sparsely. Moreover, if your vocabulary appears to be at a higher level than what’s to be expected of a person of your age, essay recipients may not believe that it’s your work, therefore rejecting your essay outright!

The Prompt That Works for You

Let’s take a look at some of the most common CA essay prompts of 2018. Whilst doing this, you should think about what prompt best works for you and which would be the most interesting to write about. The greatest thing about the CA essay is that there isn’t just one singular topic for all applicants. Each prompt provides a number of new challenges, requiring a different way to think about each, so let’s get going and dive into some of them.

Prompt #1

“Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.”

What a great prompt! On the face of it, this prompt gives you a perfect opportunity for your passions and academic interests to come across, so there’s plenty of room to showcase yourself as best as you can. You can come up with a striking narrative that will show your personal development for whatever “incomplete” part you chose. The fact that this prompt is solely about YOU gives you a tall metaphorical platform for you to stand up and display yourself.

So what exactly is something “so meaningful”? It is up to the meaning that you associate with it. Prompt one allows you the chance to talk about something truly unique that you’re passionate about that will separate you. Perhaps you’re the only one who likes to blog about Nordic folk music? You’ll certainly stand out.

Not every passion has to be something completely unique, however. If you’re not into blogging about music, you can talk about anything that you’re passionate about. It’s not some sort of contest where the most outrageous and unique passion will win you a place at your favourite university – don’t lose sight of the meaning of the essay in the application process. Think about what’s made the most significant impact on your life so far.

If you’re writing about your background, you may want to talk about some training experiences you’ve had, your education, and any cultural insights. It’s possible to mention any experiences you’ve had when growing up whether it be interacting with your family or your brother or sister. How have your relationships made you the person you are today? Your background could include a multitude of things such as your interest in the arts, sciences, sport or any other important things. Your background is inclusive of your social environment from which you’ve come from. How has this environment influenced your thought processes, perceptions, and opinions? It’s even possible to talk about various backgrounds you’ve experienced and how they’ve become meaningful in your life.

If you choose to talk about your identity, this will allow you to discuss any questions about personal identity such as your race, gender, sexual orientation or any other parts that encompass you. What is true to the nature of yourself? Some of these ideas can pose as slightly controversial topics of discussion and writing, so always make sure that you approach them with the highest degree of caution. You won’t want to put anyone off by making any broad statements about stereotypes or any flippant comments. Think about the most dominant identity trait that you have. As an example, if you’re adventurous, you could talk about how this trait has allowed you to experience cultures and how this has made you deal with problems that needed to be solved.

If you’ve gone down the interest side of this prompt, this could pave a path for showcasing your passions – you may find that some of your passions won’t be applicable to talk about in other parts of CA application. As an example, if you’re applying for a mechanical engineering place, talking about your love for skateboarding could provide a nice touch. If you’re looking at a fashion course, writing about your keen interest in mathematics could demonstrate a whole new side of you to the admin officer. Where else would you write about these things? People should know of the great things about you!

Prompt #2

“The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?”

This prompt is a true test to your personality. You won’t want to talk about an unequivocally dull failure, e.g. forgetting to bring your textbook to school, or a setback that isn’t really one. Don’t be afraid of talking about a true failure, because this prompt is not about making yourself look bad. It is clear that this prompt is a way for the reader to view your personality and see how you can overcome adversity. What a great way to illustrate how you have the personality and wisdom to rise above problems, think of solutions and grow as a person.

Your response to your chosen failure and the actions that you’ve employed to rid yourself of it are things to write about and make clear in this essay. If you’ve lost touch with a member of your closest friends group, analyse why this happened, where you went wrong and how you tried to improve. Even if your friend is still distant and the problem persists, you can always talk about how you haven’t let this ruin you and how this experience has helped you grow. Let the reader see that you’re able to analyse situations – perhaps you could have done something differently as not to have this problem. What solutions worked and what solutions would be better? How could you fix things here? If well written, your thought processes should soon become apparent to the reader, highlighting your critical thinking and reasoning faculties. Working on tackling obstacles is a way to talk about your approach to controversial issues, or even your understanding of ethics.

It’s still possible to talk about a series of smaller or disparate failures that you’ve experienced but have worked positively to overcome. If for example, you’ve always been very shy, you could talk about how you managed to seek help, read about how to overcome your issues and ultimately try and fix your social anxiety. This powerful and thought-provoking prompt could put you in the running in the application process.

Prompt #3

“Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?”

It’s not typical of students to participate or march in protests, but one could still yield a first-class response from this prompt. Instead of challenging a belief in this sense, you could focus on a time when you took a different stance on some social conventions and questioned some societal norms. In doing so, perhaps you raised some salient points? It’s important that this doesn’t become a crusade against some social issue or a platform for moral superiority, but rather that you can reflect on your experiences and analyse your situations.

Perhaps you felt strongly about some situation and this piqued your curiosity, sparking your train of thought? Whatever you choose to write about, the most important thing is not to lose sight of the essay at hand. In a piece of reflective writing, you want to take the reader on a journey to explore your cognitive processes that lead to making decisions.

If you’re struggling for ideas but like the idea of a reflective essay, brainstorm some ideas by writing a problem down and then looking at different solutions you could use to address it, whilst including justifications for doing so. The more you explain and justify your solutions to the problem, the better your response can be.

In the end, you’ll want to demonstrate that you have some degree of logical thinking and an attitude to do what’s right. This could be a great prompt to showcase your morals and critical faculties. In describing the outcome, you could talk about why that outcome came about and what you could have done better. There is plenty of room for analysis and an intriguing essay here.

Prompt #4

“Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma — anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.”

This prompt allows you to choose between three different ideas and gives you quite a broad scope to play with because you can talk about anything as long as it is of importance to you personally. We’re sure, after reading this, you could think of at least ten different problems straight away off the top of your head, but it’s essential that you pick one that is profoundly concerning to you personally so that you can make the reader aware of its personal impact.

There are many ways that you could approach this prompt. It’s possible to tell more of an origin type story about why the problem became interesting to you or you could explain the consequences of the problem at hand plus its resolutions. There’s leeway in writing this essay, depending on the nature of your problem, your solution, and your personal experience.

Describing a problem doesn’t mean you’ll have to shed some light on deep theories and present a detailed explanation involving lots of jargon. Sure, you’re describing the problem, but this will not showcase anything about you. You’ve got to remember that the main reason why you’re writing a CA essay in the first place is that you’re trying to make the reader aware of your personality, skills, and reasons as to why you should be considered. So if you’re going to pick an intellectual challenge, there’s no need to go into a verbal spew of quantum mechanics in order to detail your problem, leaving you with 15 words to spare, after all, what does this say about you?

Along with a description of the problem needs to come an explanation of the experience that led you to realise that it was personally important. Why was this a grave problem? Presumably, you’re going to talk about a grave problem, not forgetting to take the rubbish out in the morning for a month (this wouldn’t offer a very exciting solution). So how do you want to solve the problem after identifying a solution? This is the real showcase of your problem-solving abilities. Evaluate what you could have done better or perhaps your solution was just one of many? Maybe your problem was just a small piece of an even bigger problem that society should try and solve, for example, if you were trying to help your friend through their chronic drug addiction, maybe this raises other issues for other ordinary members of society. Perhaps tackling one case of drug addiction is just a part of an epidemic of drug addiction in the country and you can talk about some of the solutions for this.

The question allows you to expand into the hypothetical territory by considering a problem you’d like to solve. This is a great way to use your imagination, but think carefully about choosing a topic that will give you enough to talk about tangible solutions. Avoid any cliche problems, e.g. solving climate change or bringing about world peace because it will just look like you’ve been lazy in thinking of an idea. Try to avoid any problems that require vague solutions, e.g. to solve the problem of overpopulation, one could repopulate the human race on Mars – how and why? Let’s not get carried away here.

Prompt #5

“Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.”

Much like the prompt on problem-solving, there is a really broad array of things to choose from and discuss. It seems that the sky’s the limit here! So what kind of things could you choose? Do any formal or informal events come to mind? Perhaps you’ve been a part of a religious event or some other sort of ritual whereby you “rose up in the ranks”, maybe in a spiritual way (e.g. in a Bar Mitzvah) or in a social sense (e.g. being elected the leader of your year). As a brainstorming exercise, consider any moments in your life describing a transgression and note them down – pick which had the most profound change and think about why it was so profound. Again, the essay recipient isn’t going to be interested in the detail of the accomplishment, realization or event in question, but rather in the way you’ve grown.

It isn’t necessarily the case that the particular realization, event or accomplishment needs to be one of enormous grandeur, there’s no need to resort to describing an excerpt of the latest Hollywood drama here. The severity of the situation needn’t be an issue here. Perhaps you have a simple event that really caused you to change your ways of thinking or inspired you in a unique way. For example, perhaps you’ve always followed in the footsteps of your family that have never been particularly enthusiastic about sport, but when you reluctantly accepted a late birthday present of a free kayaking lesson, this immediately sparked an interest and put into reality that you loved kayaking. Upon hitting the water in this kayak, you went out of your way and out of your comfort zone to realise that you need to try new things and open your mind to other experiences in the future.

What’s going to make your essay stand out here is a definition of what has really grown you as a person and then going into detail about the circumstances of this growth and the ways in which it related to an understanding of you and other people. It’s not as important to detail exactly how you grew, but rather why you grew and you’ll need to elaborate on the reasons. There is even room for a bit of analysis for the future – to what degree will you keep on growing as a result of the case you’ve described and are you likely to keep developing because of it for a lot longer in the future?

Prompt #6

“Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?”

Let’s not take this literally, of course, you’ll never lose track of time! Here you can expand upon a small idea or concept in a large and profound way, giving you lots to write about. The key is in the words “all track of time”, indicating that you must, and we mean must, talk about something that is intensely meaningful to you.

One idea is to think about your passions and interests – narrow down from these and try and think of the most striking thing about one of your passions. Are you getting nearer to the topic you’ll be discussing? Or perhaps when you read the prompt, an idea came to you instantly. When brainstorming what to write about, put an idea under scrutiny and think about what engaging qualities it may have in order to engage with this idea on a deeper level. If you find many things to discuss, it could prove to be the idea for you to use.

The topic could be broad, for instance, “language”, with a discussion of how it’s evolved and adapted over time. Perhaps you find it so captivating because of the vast differences in languages over the world, from Asian characters, to the multitude of tenses in western languages. You can expand on your topic by finding areas within it that are of particular interest to you and then expanding on them. If it captivates you, it must be intriguing, so explain why it is.

Similarly, your topic could have a narrower focus, but you could really expand on it in a detailed way. If you like cycling, you could discuss the joy of physical movement and the feeling you get when you’re going at full tilt. A top tip is to make use of descriptive writing – use metaphors, paint a picture of the sound of the wind as you’re pedaling downhill or the feel of the road vibrating through your shins. Building up a picture will help you answer exactly why you’re captivated by something. It’s no use saying that you love cycling – you’ll need to put the contents of your thoughts on exhibition and show your true emotional connection. Following on, you could progress on to reveal your passion for the complexity of cycling, all the physics and mechanics of various parts – why do certain bolts and chain-rings trump others? Show off your geeky side and intelligence. There are many things that you could show off your personality and flare.

Prompt #7

“Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.”

Wow, a topic of your choice! This prompt actually advocates that you can write your own question, which is a great bonus. If you already have a strong arsenal of previous essays, then you could easily drag one out to help inspire you.

However, this is not to say that you can just rehash a previous essay, because even if it’s the highest graded essay you’ve ever written, the CA essay is all about reaching beyond high grade scores and focusing on you. This prompt isn’t one to just be lazy towards – anyone could simply interpret the prompt to the meaning that you don’t have to think too hard about what’s going to be the best fit for an essay, but you’ll need to give the prompt some serious thought, otherwise, you’re unlikely to succeed.

Instead, as a brainstorming technique, gather up any past essays that you’ve completed. Two words need to be considered: how and why. How is your topic going to impress and why is it a worthy topic? Your writing style will need to be on point here, so that you can showcase a strong personality and voice. The essay needs to make a long-lasting impression. Designing a prompt completely on the fly could prove to be quite a daunting and time-consuming task – it’s best to have something that you can work with.

Avoid topics that can make you look bad and that have negative connotations – it’s a no-brainer. Even if you can write well about your drug use, colleges won’t want to have to deal with illegal activities and the consequences of substance abuse on campus. Equally, admins aren’t going to be thoroughly impressed by your active sex life – these things may seem interesting to your close circle of friends, but they won’t display much maturity and could provide a cringe-worthy piece of text. As previously mentioned, also avoid cliche topics that have been done time and time again, such as your travel journal or a dream sequence.

As a rule of thumb, put yourself in the readers’ shoes and consider how you’d feel if you were reading your essay. Writing can be therapeutic, but the CA essay needn’t be, so refrain from writing about uncomfortable topics that relate to traumatic times in your personal life as they’re likely to inspire discomfort in the reader. It will be difficult to write about such essay topics whilst also conveying a positive message.

Conclusion: Let Them See the Real You

So there you have it. Plenty of great examples and advice to get your CA essay on the move. It can’t be stressed enough that your essay needs to showcase YOU as a person. Meredith Lombardi, the Associate Director of the Common Application programme herself, has mentioned that the CA essay prompts are there to give all applicants the opportunity to share their ideas and voice with colleges all over, telling their unique story and helping bring it to life. You should take these words on board. The CA essay is certainly not a place to list your complex accomplishments, because the college application already gives you a space to do that, so don’t go on about it in the essay. In the same way, this is not the place to list excuses for your failing grades and any mishaps in your high school career!

Write with style and finesse, whilst also putting your identity, personality, interests, character, and aspirations out on display for all recipients to see. Make sure not to rush into it initially, spending plenty of time planning and formulating your ideas in order not to hit any sort of writer’s block. With the following examples and strategies, you’ll be at a key advantage and can be well on your way.

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A Few General Facts about How To Write 5 Paragraph Essay ?

April 29, 2021
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In general, the 5-paragraph essay is regarded as the typical essay writing task. This type of essay is utilized in the majority of well-established examinations, like TOEFL, IELTS or SAT.

Seeing as in the majority of such examinations you need to stick to a time limit when it comes to finishing the “Writing” part, it’s advisable to learn the structure of the 5-paragraph essay by heart. This way, you’ll be able to complete the exam swiftly and efficiently. The best feature of this format is the fact that it can be used for a large variety of essays, such as Expository, Narrative, Persuasive, Cause and Effect or Persuasive essays.

5-Paragraph Essay Subject Examples

Here are a few of the most recurrent subjects on which students write 5-paragraph essays:

  • Is an individual able to memorize a life lesson from an event they weren’t part of?
  • Is one able to learn from the errors of other individuals?
  • Is it moral to conduct experiments on animals?
  • Should homosexual matrimony be legalized?
  • Should the legislation on firearms become harsher?
  • Should the capital punishment be fully eliminated?
  • Should cannabis become legal?
  • Should all students benefit from free-of-charge education?

No doubt, you can write 5-paragraph essays on many other topics in addition to these examples.

The Structure of a 5-Paragraph Essay

Introduction: 3 to 5 Phrases

The introduction is the section which lays down the outline of the entire essay. The initial phase represents the HOOK sentence.

  • The Hook Sentence has the purpose of catching the reader’s interest.
  • In general, the Hook Sentence is a rhetorical one. Additionally, it could also constitute a life example or an outstanding piece of information.
  • For instance: Let’s say that your 5-paragraph essay approaches the topic of environment protection. In that case, you can come up with a sentence like: “Is it normal to live in a world of barren lands and waste?”

The question above is a rhetorical one. This means that no one expects a response, as the answer is evident.

Short Introduction of Substantiated Arguments (1 to 3)

  • In this section, you should concisely present your substantiated arguments. The key is to avoid disclosing an excessive amount of information.
  • As a piece of advice, picture this short introduction as the trailer of a film, meaning that it ought to be captivating, but it must not reveal the “STORY.”
  • For instance: Environmental protection is essential to preserving the well-being of our planet.

Thesis Assertion

  • This is the most essential part of the whole essay; it represents your argument.
  • The argument will serve as the premise of the entire paper.
  • Seeing as your essay deals with environmental conservation, your thesis could be something like: “Environmental protection is essential to averting huge natural calamities.”
  • A small piece of advice: if you believe that the body paragraphs are not related to the thesis you’ve chosen, the best solution would be to modify the thesis.

The Three Body Paragraphs: 5 to 7 Phrases

  • This represents the “bulk” of your paper. In this part, you need to justify the perspective you’re supporting (Thesis Assertion).
  • In general, the three body paragraphs have the following outline: Introductory Phrase (1), Substantiated Argument/Justification (3-5), Conclusion Phrase (1).
  • The Introductory Phrase must concisely present your argument. It shouldn’t disclose too much. For instance, you could say something like: “Disforestation and atmosphere contamination affect the characteristics of the atmosphere and intensify the probability of illness in addition to damaging our planet!”
  • Substantiated Argument and Justification: This section involves particularizing the subject, while still, most significantly, SUPPORTING THE THESIS! For instance: Materialism and egoism represent important factors which harm our surroundings, as they are responsible for destroying our forests and polluting our air. While initially a couple of people may benefit from this, in the long run, these factors are dangerous to the entire population. For instance, in Beijing, the atmosphere quality is so low that people are obliged to use masks to be allowed to move around the city.
  • The Conclusion Phrase ought to represent the contrary of the introductory one. Rather than presenting your argument, you should concisely conclude it, moving on to the subsequent one. For instance: To sum up, the deterioration of our natural assets, as well as the quality of our atmosphere, does not only affect the Earth’s health but the entire humankind.

KEEP IN MIND THAT ALL 3 BODY PARAGRAPHS MUST HAVE THE SAME STRUCTURE!

IMPORTANT ADVICE:

The arguments you offer ought to be presented in the following order:

  • The first body paragraph ought to include your second most powerful argument
  • The second body paragraph ought to describe your poorest argument
  • The third body paragraph ought to present your most powerful argument

To have a better idea of the structure of a 5-paragraph essay, take a look at the following table:

Paragraph no.

Content

1

Present Subject 3 Substantiated Notions (A, B, D) Thesis Assertion

2

Present and sustain your first substantiated notion using 3 proofs.

  1. Subject Phrase
  1. Proof
  2. Proof
  3. Proof
  1. Conclusion Phrase

3

Present and sustain your second substantiated notion using 3 proofs.

  1. Subject Phrase
  1. Proof
  2. Proof
  3. Proof
  1. Conclusion Phrase

4

Present and sustain your third substantiated notion using 3 proofs.

  1. Subject Phrase
  1. Proof
  2. Proof
  3. Proof
  1. Conclusion Phrase

5

Reiterate Thesis Assertion Provide a summary of the 3 fundamental substantiated notions (A, B, D) General Conclusion Phrase

Conclusion (3 to 5 Phrases): This must reflect your introduction

  • Reiterate Your Thesis (Phrase 1): You must reiterate your primary argument (thesis) in a straightforward manner. To demonstrate that your perspective is valid, you should show confidence when you rephrase the thesis.
  • For instance: The security and endurance of our planet are highly reliant on the manner in which we choose to behave towards it, and the more attentively we stimulate the procedure, the more we will profit from it.
  • Providing conclusions for your substantiated arguments (1 to 3 Phrases): This part involves paraphrasing the central ideas of your arguments in a single phrase per paragraph.
  • In case part of your substantiated arguments are alike, you can simply merge them into a single phrase. This way, you’ll preserve an adequate organization. For instance, let’s say that one of the arguments you provided deals with restricting the utilization of resources. In that case, you can write something like “Restricting the utilization of our natural assets and enhancing their performance represent essential methods of strengthening the health of the Earth.”

Drafting a Conclusion for the Hook Phrase (Facultative)

A great manner of finalizing a paper is by offering something unpredicted, which may amaze the reader. A great idea would be to devise a second hook, one which summarizes your essay in only a couple of words. Ideally, create a rhetorical question.

For instance: “The soundness of the Earth is highly significant, and in the end, we don’t want to turn our planet into a desert, don’t we?”

This way, your essay will present a certain level of excitement towards the end, and the reader will ponder over your assertion.

Traditional Grading Criteria

Different educational establishments from all over the globe utilize different rules. Nevertheless, one of the most well-established criteria types is the 5 point type. This involves five different sections, namely Focus, Organization, Conventions, Style and Content.

  • Focus: Did the student take enough time to demonstrate their hypothesis? Did they meet this target?
  • Organization: Did the essay have a fluent style? Did the student move from one paragraph to the other in a steady manner? Did they stick to the adequate structure without deviating from it?
  • Conventions: Was the paper written using good grammar? Were the phrases too long?
  • Style: Did the student utilize high-quality lexicon? Did they repeat words too often? Were the phrase structures original enough?
  • Content: Did the student succeed in demonstrating their argument? Did they include coherent and accurate assertions? Did they come up with powerful arguments?

How Do I Proceed If I Have No Idea How to Write the Paper?

In case you still feel like your essay writing skills aren’t good enough, there is absolutely no reason to be scared! Many students encounter such issues. Fortunately for you, Elite Essay Writers is the most reliable essay writing service you could ever hope to find! All of our essay writers are experts in drafting 5-paragraph essays. Whether you need a full essay written from scratch or simply a bit of proofreading, we’re always here to help! If you want to purchase a professional essay because you don’t feel ready to write one yourself, take a look at our review section. You’ll be amazed by how simply and rapidly we can offer solutions to your college issues, for the right price!

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How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline

April 29, 2021
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Yes, yes — who needs an essay outline when you know the subject? After all, it’s all just a waste of time, made up by nerds who have no other things to do. Well, yes and no. In some cases, an outline may be indeed excessive. But, when writing an argumentative essay, even the best students need one. It’s not about the writing block or not knowing the subject. It’s about writing a logical, coherent, and impressive argumentative paper that gets you an A+.

You should already know by now — there is nothing worse than staring at a blank essay page, especially when the deadline is approaching. And you should also know that even the best students sometimes experience a writer’s block. This is exactly when an outline for an argumentative essay comes in.

Think of this outline as a plan for your paper. Yes, researching and structuring it will take some time. But, it can save your hours on writing. After all, an argumentative paper is should be a properly structured and well-researched piece of work. So, you cannot just fill the blanks in with some random ramblings — not unless you are ready to settle for a C+.

So, cutting a long story short, let’s find out what makes a good outline for an argumentative essay, why you need it, and how to structure this document to save you hours of writing.

Structuring an argumentative essay outline

Just like the essay itself, an outline for your paper should follow a certain structure. In case of a standard, five-paragraph argumentative essay, this structure goes as follows:

  1. Introduction
  2. Giving your supporting arguments
  3. Refuting opponents’ arguments
  4. Conclusion

Yes, as simple as that! Sounds like nothing scary — so far. Now, let’s take a look at each of these essential sections to find out how we can nail them and get you that A+ you deserve!

Argumentative Essay Introduction: Your Outline

Introduction should make it pretty clear what your paper is going to be about. In case of an argumentative essay, it should also lay down a solid foundation for the main argument you are about to make. Traditionally, an intro of an argumentative essay will include a hook, background info about the topic, and a thesis.

Hook. What is a hook, exactly? Simply put, it is a sentence that grabs your readers’ attention and urges them to read further. Sure, writing a truly compelling hook is not always easy, but since an argumentative essay usually argues a certain perspective (one of many), it should not be too difficult.

Let’s say, you are writing an essay about marijuana legalization and are trying to convince your audience that cannabis should, in fact, be legalized. You can start off like this:

“Those interested in improving their mood and overall well-being should forget about shrinks and spirits and move on to smoking pot instead.”

A hook like this may sound bold and not very academic, but since your goal here is to catch the readers’ attention, it serves its purpose just fine.

Background info. Next, you move on to introducing some background info about the topic. In case of our marijuana legalization essay, it could go like this:

“Even though many states in the US have already legalized marijuana for medical purposes, plenty of them still shun away from the idea. However, medical and relaxation qualities of the plant have been extensively proven by multiple researches on the subject. And, despite opponents’ arguments that marijuana is a gateway drug, there is no scientific proof of cannabis causing addiction — or, forcing users to move on to heavier drugs.”

Thesis statement. It appears at the end of your introductory paragraph. By the time you make a thesis statement, your position on the subject should be made pretty clear. If you managed to write a compelling hook and give some background info, making a thesis statement should not be much of a problem. Our example could go something like this:

“The use of cannabis can alleviate stress, relieve pain from chemotherapy treatment and help patients with clinical depression, which is exactly why the United States should consider legalizing marijuana on a national level.”

Pay attention to ‘should’ in this example. Even though our position on the topic has already been made clear with a hook and background info, ‘should’ in a thesis statement makes the impression truly complete.

Also, notice how we mention alleviating stress, relieving pain from chemotherapy treatment and helping patients with clinical depression. This information lays down a foundation for our body paragraphs and makes it clear for the readers what we are going to talk about further.

Ok, so now that our foundations have been laid, what next?

Developing your arguments in the body paragraphs

Now, it’s time for the main work on your argumentative essay outline — that is, developing your argument.

Our thesis statement has three claims (alleviating stress, relieving pain from chemotherapy treatment, and helping patients with clinical depression); each of them should be backed up by some factual evidence. This will give your paper a well-informed look and make it credible for the readers.

Note, however, that even though each claim needs backing up, the actual number of claims may differ. Here, a lot will depend on the length of your essay, as well as your topic. You can have two claims, or four, or even five — as many as you need to develop your argument.

Now, what is a claim, exactly? This is a point you make to support your argument (thesis).

So, our first claim was stress alleviation. Now, we have to dwell on it in the first body paragraph. For example:

“Regular use of cannabis can help alleviate stress, which is a huge benefit for our hectic lifestyles.”

This is your claim (aka topic sentence of the first paragraph). It’s been made pretty clear, but who is going to believe us? So, our next step is to provide some factual evidence.

Evidence. Every claim you make should be supported by factual, properly researched evidence. You cannot use your opinions or personal anecdotes here. For example:

“Recent research by (source) proves that people who occasionally use cannabis report stressful experiences 20% less often than people who do smoke marijuana.”

As a rule, you will have three claims in a typical argumentative essay. Each of those claims should be ideally supported by at least three pieces of evidence. However, you can adjust the number of supporting evidence, just like you can adjust the number of claims you make. Once again, here everything will depend on the arguments you are making and the points you are trying to prove. So, unless your teacher has given you precise instructions about the number of claims and evidence to support them, you are free to decide for yourself.

Ok, so now you know how to present and support your claims. Is that it? Are we are ready to conclude? Not quite. First, we’ll have to refute opponents’ arguments.

Refuting opponents’ arguments

This is traditionally the last part of your argumentative essay outline. It helps to acknowledge the fact that there are other opinions on the subject and that you respect them. However, your goal is to convince the audience in your point of view. So, while acknowledging other opinions, you are to prove these opinions unjustified.

Remember that you are to stay polite and reasonable. You cannot resort to offenses. Your goal is to prove your opponents wrong, but you are to stay civilized.

In our intro examples, we have already laid a foundation for opponents’ opinion. Remember? “Despite opponents’ arguments that marijuana is a gateway drug, there is no scientific proof of cannabis causing addiction — or, forcing users to move on to heavier drugs.”

Now, it’s time to go back to this statement once again and give evidence that proves it wrong. For example:

“While opponents argue that marijuana can be a gateway drug, leading to potential drug abuse in the future, there is no scientific proof that links cannabis use to further transition to heavier substances. In fact, research by (source) shows that 65% of cannabis users do not use any other substances at all.”

Here goes — we’ve acknowledged our opponents’ opinion and proven it untrue. By the way, the stats on cannabis use are totally made up here — so do not refer to them in your own paper. Just FYI.

Ok, we’re almost done here. Now, it’s time to wrap up.

Concluding your argumentative essay outline

Basically, a solid conclusion for an argumentative paper will accomplish two goals.

1. Highlight the importance of your subject. Just in case readers got lost in your reasoning, you are to remind them why the subject in question is important. Usually, this goal is achieved by restating (not retyping!) your thesis statement. For example:

“Cannabis legalization on a national level can help people with clinical depression, cancer patients, and people suffering from stress on a regular basis.”

2. Draw a picture of the world that does not accept your opinion on the subject. Here, your goal is to impress the readers and make them think. Giving a (sometimes emotional) prediction for the future serves this purpose perfectly. For example:

“Unless we want our citizens depressed, moody, and in pain, we are to take more action.”

By the way, this statement can be expanded further, into giving suggestions on the kind of action we need to take. However, you should also remember that conclusions should not feature any new information. So, unless you’ve spoken about the action (raising awareness on the issue, petitioning the government, educating children) in your body paragraphs, you should leave a call to action out. That’s pretty much all you need to know about drafting an argumentative essay outline.

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