Can you find fossils in metamorphic rocks?

Can you find fossils in metamorphic rocks?

Metamorphic rock, such as marble, is formed by tremendous heat and pressure. Fossils are not usually found in either igneous or metamorphic rocks.

Is it possible to find fossils in metamorphic rocks Why?

Metamorphic rocks rarely contain fossils. Any that were present in the original sedimentary rock will not normally survive the heat and pressure.

What type of rock do we find fossils?

sedimentary rock
Most fossils “hide out” in sedimentary rock . When tiny bits of rocks and minerals (called sediment) join together over millions of years, they become sedimentary rock. Plants and animals that become sandwiched in this sediment eventually turn into fossils. Two examples of sedimentary rocks are sandstone and shale.

Do metamorphic rocks contain holes?

Metamorphic rocks form beneath the surface of the earth. But if the lava cools slowly, the rocks will have plenty of texture, gas bubbles, tiny holes and spaces. This type of rock is made out of sand, shells, pebbles and other materials. Together, these particles are “sediment”.

Why are metamorphic rocks harder than others?

Dynamic Metamorphism also occurs because of mountain-building. These huge forces of heat and pressure cause the rocks to be bent, folded, crushed, flattened, and sheared. Metamorphic rocks are almost always harder than sedimentary rocks.

Do metamorphic rocks have gas bubbles?

Metamorphic rocks form beneath the surface of the earth. They change from the intense heat and pressure. But if the lava cools slowly, the rocks will have plenty of texture, gas bubbles, tiny holes and spaces. This type of rock is made out of sand, shells, pebbles and other materials.

What rocks have tiny holes?

Igneous Rock When the lava or magma cool quickly the rock will look smooth and shiny. When lava or magma cool slowly the rocks will have plenty of texture, gas bubbles, tiny holes and spaces.

Are metamorphic rocks hard?

Metamorphic rocks are almost always harder than sedimentary rocks. They are generally as hard and sometimes harder than igneous rocks. They form the roots of many mountain chains and are exposed to the surface after the softer outer layers of rocks are eroded away.