What is pushbroom scanner in remote sensing?

What is pushbroom scanner in remote sensing?

A Push broom scanner (along track scanner) is a technology for obtaining satellite images with optical cameras. It is used for passive remote sensing from space. In a push broom sensor, a line of sensors arranged perpendicular to the flight direction of the spacecraft is used.

Is an example of pushbroom scanner?

Examples of spacecraft cameras using push broom imagers include Mars Express’s High Resolution Stereo Camera, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera NAC, Mars Global Surveyor’s Mars Orbiter Camera WAC, and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on board the Terra satellite.

How does Pushbroom sensor work?

Whisk broom scanners, also sometimes referred to as spotlight or across track scanners, use a mirror to reflect light onto a single detector. The mirror moves back and forth, to collect measurements from one pixel in the image at a time ( Fig. 1).

What is scanner in remote sensing?

4. REMOTE SENSING SCANNERS  Scanner in general can be defined as a device for examining, reading, or monitoring something, in particular.  A device that scans documents and converts them into digital data.

What is difference between push broom scanner and whisk broom scanner?

Push broom scanners, also sometimes referred to as along track scanners, use a line of detectors arranged perpendicular to the flight direction of the spacecraft. A push broom scanner receives a stronger signal than a whisk broom scanner because it looks at each pixel area for longer.

What do you mean by multispectral scanner?

A scanning system used to collect data over a variety of different wavelength ranges is called a multispectral scanner (MSS), and is the most commonly used scanning system. Each line is scanned from one side of the sensor to the other, using a rotating mirror (A).

What is a scanner in remote sensing?

What is the role of a scanner in remote sensing?

Many electronic (as opposed to photographic) remote sensors acquire data using scanning systems, which employ a sensor with a narrow field of view (i.e. IFOV) that sweeps over the terrain to build up and produce a two-dimensional image of the surface. Across-track scanners scan the Earth in a series of lines.